Kufic


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Ku·fic

also Cu·fic  (ko͞o′fĭk, kyo͞o′-)
adj.
Relating to or being an angular form of the Arabic alphabet used in making fine copies of the Koran.

[After al-Kūfa, a city in south-central Iraq .]

Kufic

(ˈkuːfɪk; ˈkjuː-) or

Cufic

adj
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) of, relating to, or denoting an early form of the Arabic alphabet employed in making copies of the Koran
n
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the script formed by the letters of this alphabet
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References in periodicals archive ?
Calligraphy and a rare kufic type of the 8th century were reproduced to the smallest detail.
1562-70), in which he presents a compelling argument for a Syriac origin, specifically from estranghelo to Kufic.
The example of Kufic writing is lopped off at both ends and as it stands makes no sense (Surah 4:121).
These anecdotes date from a time when interest was growing in how the Koran should be written, and in which the Kufic hand was in the course of development.
The display, which runs until July 2, consists of luminous ceramics, intricate carvings shaped from rock crystals, and artefacts decorated with Kufic calligraphy and embellished with vines and leaves.
These artifacts include rock crystal and ivory, monumental marble reliefs, ceramic lusterware (a technique popular during the Fatimid Dynasty), marble vases, copper lamps, chandeliers with kufic script and much more.
It has on display Holy Quran inscribed in major calligraphies like Kufic, Naskh, Raihan, Thulth and Bihari.
For Hafez Ibrahim's words describing the Arabic language as a vast sea with precious pearls buried in its depths, he chose the Kufic script with sharp angles, layering the words to depict depth and highlighting the dots on the letters to represent the pearls.
Highlights currently on show include a prehistoric stone tool dating back to 350,000 BCE, a milestone indicating the distance from Makkah in Kufic inscriptions, and a funerary stele from Makkah dating back to 700-900 CE from the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage.
The other highlights are a prehistoric stone tool dating back to 350,000 BCE, a milestone indicating the distance from Makkah in Kufic inscriptions and a funerary stele dating back to 700-900 CE from the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, a collection of over 400 silver Dirham coins from the National Museum - Sultanate of Oman, and an 8,000-year-old, two-headed figure from Jordan's Department of Antiquities called the Ain Ghazal Statue.
Highlights of loans from the region include a prehistoric stone tool dating back to 350,000 BCE, a milestone indicating the distance from Makkah in Kufic inscriptions, a funerary stele from Makkah dating back to 700-900 CE (100-300 AH) from the Saudi Commission for Tourism & National Heritage, a collection of over 400 silver Dirhams Coins from the Abbasid Caliphate of Iraq, the Samanid Dynasty and the Saffarid Dynasty discovered in Sidamah (Al Waqba) in 2005 CE (1425 AH) from the National Museum - Sultanate of Oman, and an 8000-year-old two-headed figure from Jordan's Department of Antiquities called Ain Ghazal Statue.
It will be followed by another workshop bynoted calligrapher and artist Ammar al Dasouki titled, 'Fatimid Kufic Calligraphy Workshop-Authenticity and Modernity', which will be held from November 5 to 28.