LDL cholesterol


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Related to LDL cholesterol: Triglycerides, HDL cholesterol

LDL cholesterol

 (ĕl′dē′ĕl′)
n.
A lipoprotein with a relatively high concentration of lipids and low concentration of protein that incorporates cholesterol and transports it to cells. High levels are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. Also called low-density lipoprotein.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.LDL cholesterol - the cholesterol in low-density lipoproteins; the `bad' cholesterol; a high level in the blood is thought to be related to various pathogenic conditions
beta-lipoprotein, LDL, low-density lipoprotein - a lipoprotein that transports cholesterol in the blood; composed of moderate amount of protein and a large amount of cholesterol; high levels are thought to be associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis
cholesterin, cholesterol - an animal sterol that is normally synthesized by the liver; the most abundant steroid in animal tissues
oxidized LDL cholesterol - LDL cholesterol that has been bombarded by free radicals; it is thought to cause atherosclerosis
References in periodicals archive ?
BARCELONA -- The maxim that lower is better for LDL cholesterol continues to hold true, even at jaw-droppingly low levels of less than 10 mg/dL, in a new analysis of data from the FOURIER trial.
Inclisiran lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL; bad) cholesterol for up to one year in patients with high cardiovascular risk and elevated LDL cholesterol, according to late-breaking results from the ORION 1 trial presented today in a Hot Line LBCT Session at ESC Congress.
Now, a meta-analysis suggests that oats can also reduce two other markers of cardiovascular disease: non-HDL cholesterol (total cholesterol minus the "good" HDL cholesterol), and apolipo-protein B (apoB), a substance that carries LDL cholesterol through the blood.
Sabatine, of Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, and colleagues note that the clinical benefits of using statins to lower LDL cholesterol are widely accepted, largely due to the high-quality evidence of their safety and efficacy in clinical trials.
It's called "The Rule of Six," because every increase in statin dosage equates to a six percent improvement in LDL cholesterol.
We recently found genetically increased concentrations of nonfasting remnant cholesterol, like increased LDL cholesterol concentrations, to be causally associated with increased ischemic heart disease (IHD) (5) risk (4, 5), independent of low concentrations of HDL cholesterol (4).
The researchers found that both male and female study participants who took a statin reduced their risk of a major cardiovascular event (heart attack, stroke, bypass surgery, cardiac death) by 21 percent and the overall risk of death by nine percent for every 1 millimole per liter (mmol/L) reduction in LDL cholesterol.
1) But much lower percentages of these people reached blood pressure or LDL cholesterol targets with treatment.
LDL cholesterol is considered "bad," in contrast to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, which is considered "good.
WASHINGTON -- High-risk patients managed to a target LDL particle number rather than to an LDL cholesterol goal had 25% fewer cardiovascular events over 3 years of follow-up.
30,2013 in JAMA Neurology suggests that having high levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol and low levels of "good" HDL cholesterol increases your risk of developing the toxic beta-amyloid plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Diets emphasizing dietary pulse intake at a median dose of 130 g/d (about 1 serving daily) significantly lowered LDL cholesterol levels compared with the control diets (mean difference -0.