Lachine


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La·chine

 (lə-shēn′, lä-)
A borough of Montreal, Quebec, Canada, on the south bank of Montreal Island. It was first settled as an estate by Sieur La Salle in 1668 and named for his futile dream of finding a westward passage to China.
References in classic literature ?
The married officers live out of barracks, and the Colonel has during all this time occupied a villa called Lachine, about half a mile from the north camp.
Now for the events at Lachine between nine and ten on the evening of last Monday.
There is a room which is used as a morning-room at Lachine.
At noon we went on board another steamboat, and reached the village of Lachine, nine miles from Montreal, by three o'clock.
13) The ethnic and class identities of the canal workers at Lachine were shaped, as Way suggests, by a migration experience that was unique in the way that it created an especially marginalized existence distinct from those who arrived in different circumstances.
Such musicians as Marc-Andre Hamelin and Chantal Juillet and singers such as Karma Gauvin made their debuts in Lachine.
By this time, manufacturing had spread both east and west of the city, choosing sites adjacent to the Lachine Canal and the north shore of the St.
Also, the rail network and the Lachine Canal were of such importance to Montreal's preeminence as an industrial city that they could perhaps have been given attention in a dedicated section.
Although the Irish were scattered throughout both cities, the immigrant sheds in Montreal were occupied completely by Irish, and Irish predominated in the environs of the Lachine Canal and for several blocks north.
The property was acquired from Chantale Cloutier of Lachine, Quebec, against the issuance of 900,000 common treasury shares of BRDC.
In a bid to attract full press coveragehe was considering a run for the Montreal mayoraltyDescary arranged a formal dedication of the Saul Bellow Library, to be followed by a celebratory luncheon at the Lachine waterfront.
This article tracks the morphogenesis of one of the birthplaces of Canadian industry: the Lachine Canal corridor in Montreal.