laetare


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laetare

(liːˈtɛərɪ; laɪˈtɑːrɪ)
n
the fourth Sunday of Lent
References in periodicals archive ?
Also known as Laetare Sunday, from the first words of theIntroit at mass today, "Laetare Jerusalem
On Laetare Sunday my husband and I noticed a young woman slip into the pew just ahead of us.
Like Laetare Sunday in Lent, Gaudete Sunday reminds us that our Christian faith is marked at its core with a deep sense of joy-waiting in joy, the third point for our Advent reflections.
The connection between well and wife becomes clearer in the next verse, when Solomon concludes: "sit vena tua benedicta et laetare cum muliere adulescentiae tuae" (Let your fountain be blessed, and rejoice in the wife of your youth) (5: 18).
8) Grout notes that there are four such antiphons: Alma Redemptoris Mater ("Sweet Mother of the Redeemer") to be sung from Advent to February 1; Ave Regina Caelorum ("Hail, Queen of the Heavens") for February 2 to Wednesday of Holy Week; Regina Caeli Laetare ("Rejoice, Queen of Heaven") from Easter to
From this first chapter we learn that the texts of some chants in the offices for Lambert and Theodard strongly resemble civic odes, which is suggested by the language in antiphons such as Laetare et lauila Deum Legia, which extols Liege to praise Lambert for his protection of the city.
Serving as examples in this respect are the Marian antiphon of the first motet, Regina caeli laetare, furnished with a commentary, or the lyrics to Sancte Paule Apostole, celebrating Saint Paul, put together from a number of liturgical texts.
Saucier begins with a description of the antiphon Laetare et lauda and its use in a ceremonial display of St.
market control on the supply of medicines and pharmaceutical products to residents of the Laetare institutions and hawthorns for a period of 4 years.
Symphonie from Plaude Laetare Gallia by Jean-Baptiste Lully: All facets of great Baroque music rolled into a three-minute piece - rhythm, energy, harmony, orchestra, solo singers and chorus.
Most historians believe that Mothering Sunday in the UK evolved from the 16th-century Christian practice of visiting one's mother church annually on this day, also known as Laetare Sunday.