Lancashire


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Lan·ca·shire

 (lăng′kə-shîr′, -shər)
A historical region of northwest England on the Irish Sea. It was part of the kingdom of Northumbria in Anglo-Saxon times and became a county palatine in 1351. Long noted for its textiles, the area grew rapidly after the Industrial Revolution.

Lancashire

(ˈlæŋkəˌʃɪə; -ʃə)
n
1. (Placename) a county of NW England, on the Irish Sea: became a county palatine in 1351 and a duchy attached to the Crown; much reduced in size after the 1974 boundary changes, losing the Furness district to Cumbria and much of the south to Greater Manchester, Merseyside, and Cheshire: Blackburn with Darwen and Blackpool became independent unitary authorities in 1998. It was traditionally a cotton textiles manufacturing region. Administrative centre: Preston. Pop (excluding unitary authorities): 1 147 000 (2003 est). Area (excluding unitary authorities): 2889 sq km (1115 sq miles). Abbreviation: Lancs
2. (Cookery) a mild whitish-coloured cheese with a crumbly texture

Lan•ca•shire

(ˈlæŋ kəˌʃɪər, -ʃər)

n.
a county in NW England. 1,408,300; 1174 sq. mi. (3040 sq. km). Also called Lancaster.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lancashire - a historical area of northwestern England on the Irish SeaLancashire - a historical area of northwestern England on the Irish Sea; noted for textiles
England - a division of the United Kingdom
References in classic literature ?
But they were too wise to attempt it, contenting themselves with rowing lustily to windward along the starboard side of a big ship, the Lancashire Queen.
Closer and closer we came, and I, lying down forward, was just reaching out to grasp the skiff, when it ducked under the great stern of the Lancashire Queen.
If you really want a cottage in the country," said he, "and the most absolute peace and quiet to be got in this world, I know of the very hing on my land in Lancashire.
He chose them by their titles, and the first he read was The Lancashire Witches, and then he read The Admirable Crichton, and then many more.
Behind them marched six hundred Cheshire and Lancashire archers, bearing the badge of the Audleys, followed by the famous Lord Audley himself, with the four valiant squires, Dutton of Dutton, Delves of Doddington, Fowlehurst of Crewe, and Hawkestone of Wainehill, who had all won such glory at Poictiers.
He was poor and, it would seem, ill, so he did not return to London, but went to live with relatives in the country in Lancashire.
In short, I ventured to avoid signing a contract of marriage, and the reason why I did it was because the lady that had invited me so earnestly to go with her into Lancashire insisted so positively upon it, and promised me such great fortunes, and such fine things there, that I was tempted to go and try.
So, whether I am waiting for a hostile message, or an assignation, or a penitent remonstrance, or an impromptu wrestle with my friend Bounderby in the Lancashire manner - which would seem as likely as anything else in the present state of affairs - I'll dine,' said Mr.
Here are two licences permitting two pigs to go to market in Lancashire.
Next, after a year or two with his kinspeople in Lancashire, in the North of England, he came to London, hoping through literature to win high political place, and attached himself to the household of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, Queen Elizabeth's worthless favorite.
If they want a light-weight to be throwed for practice, Cornwall, Devonshire, or Lancashire, let 'em throw me.
Here is a Lancashire lass, the daughter of a common pitman.

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