Landdrost


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Landdrost

(ˈlændrɒst)
n
1. (Historical Terms) history South African the chief magistrate of a district
2. (Law) history South African the chief magistrate of a district
[C18: Afrikaans, from Dutch land country + drost sheriff, bailiff]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Landdrost (bailiff) Steven Poelman painted the picture of the uncertainty that prevailed over the case:
Then, suddenly, the case broke open when Danie van Sumbauwa came forward 'of her own accord' and began talking, according to the Landdrost, 'pained by the sting of her own conscience'.
11977, Eijsch ad Morrem nevens mindere eijschen conclusie crimineel item declaratoir den heer Landdrost, Steven Poelman Ratt: Off: Eijschr contra Amien c.
67) Declaratoir van Sjech Nannekoe moor voor den heer Landdrost Steven Poelman Ratt: Off: / B (50ct.
17) Joachim van Plettenberg presided over this eisch, or claim, which was brought by the landdrost of Stellenbosch and Drakenstein, Lucas Sigismundius Faber on 4 April 1771.
A final example of the application of Roman Law to slavery at the Cape concerns the eisch brought by the landdrost Martinus Bergh before the governor, Maurits Pasques de Chavonnes, on 10 February 1724.
In assessing the punishment for the crimes of Andries of Ceylon the landdrost refers to the following Roman-Dutch authorities, citing precise book, chapter, section and page references: Simon van Leeuwen, who recommends the gallows, the sword, or other forms of capital punishment for armed, violent, premeditated murder; Andreas Gail, who agrees with Van Leeuwen; and Joost de Damhouder.
17) The case is recorded in CJ 400: Eisch en conclusie in the case of Landdrost of Stellenbosch contra Hester Pienaar 4 April 1771, 170-85.
Once the British blockhouses made movement through the countryside virtually impossible for Boer commandos, as well as civilian officials such as landdrosts and veldcomets, their hold over their African tenants ceased to exist.