Lateran


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Lateran

(ˈlætərən)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) Also called: Lateran palace a palace in Rome, formerly the official residence of the popes
2. (Roman Catholic Church) any of five ecumenical councils held in this palace between 1123 and 1512
3. (Roman Catholic Church) the basilica of Saint John Lateran, the cathedral church of Rome
[from Latin: the district is named after the ancient Roman family Plautii Laterani]

Lat•er•an

(ˈlæt ər ən)

n.
the church of St. John Lateran, the cathedral church of the city of Rome; the church of the pope as bishop of Rome.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lateran - the site in Rome containing the church of Rome and the Lateran PalaceLateran - the site in Rome containing the church of Rome and the Lateran Palace
Lateran Palace - a palace that served as the residence of the popes until the 14th century
capital of Italy, Eternal City, Italian capital, Rome, Roma - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
References in classic literature ?
I beg your excellency's pardon for keeping you waiting," said the man, in the Roman dialect, "but I don't think I'm many minutes after my time, ten o'clock his just struck on the Lateran.
John Lateran, the Campagna, the Appian Way, the Seven Hills, the Baths of Caracalla, the Claudian Aqueduct, the Cloaca Maxima--the eternal bore designed the Eternal City, and unless all men and books do lie, he painted every thing in it
The Vatican City State was founded following the signing of the Lateran Pacts between the Holy See and Italy on February 11th, 1929.
1929: The 109 acres of the Vatican in Rome was made an independent sovereign state under the Lateran Treaty.
They cover Joachim the theologian: Trinitarian speculation and doctrinal debate; Joachim the theorist of history and society; Joachim the abbot: monastic reform and the foundation of the Florensian order; Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, and the critique of Joachimist topics from the Fourth Lateran Council to Dante; the influence of Joachim in the 13th century; longing for the third age: revolutionary Joachim, communism, and National Socialism; and the reception of Joachim in contemporary theology and postmodern philosophy.
Taking Roman patronage as her focus, Robertson contributes significant historical data while concurrently setting her discussion in dialogue with several major studies of seventeenth-century Roman patrons, including Francis Haskell's Patrons and Painters (1963), Sydney Freedberg's Circa 1600 (1983), and Jack Freiberg's The Lateran in 1600 (1995).
1929: The Papal State, extinct since 1870, was revived as the State of Vatican City in Rome, as a result of the Lateran Treaty.
Tenders are invited for Construction of Community Lateran at Mungapada in W.
The 21 participants, including students, faculty and administrators from the Pontifical Lateran University in Rome, came to the program in New York for a week of seminars and informal visits with pastors and parish workers in the Philadelphia area, where Villanova is located.
John Lateran for a meeting with the Roman clergy ahead of his trip to Mexico.
1929: The 109 acres of the Vatican in Rome was made an independent sovereign state under the Lateran 1940: John Buchan, pictured, Scottish novelist who became Lord Tweedsmuir, died.
Along with the yellow star, the discs are perhaps most reminiscent of the "Jew hats" in Italy and France during the 11th and 12th centuries; the pointed caps were mandated by the Fourth Council of the Lateran of 1215.