Latin


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Latin: Latin language

Lat·in

 (lăt′n)
n.
1.
a. The Indo-European language of the ancient Latins and Romans and the most important cultural language of western Europe until the end of the 17th century.
b. The Latin language and literature from the end of the third century bc to the end of the second century ad.
2.
a. A member of a Latin people, especially a native or inhabitant of Latin America.
b. A Latino or Latina.
3. A native or resident of ancient Latium.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or composed in Latin: a Latin scholar; Latin verse.
2.
a. Of or relating to ancient Rome, its people, or its culture.
b. Of or relating to Latium, its people, or its culture.
3. Of or relating to the languages that developed from Latin, such as Italian, French, Spanish, and Portuguese, or to the peoples that speak them.
4.
a. Of or relating to the peoples, countries, or cultures of Latin America.
b. Of or relating to Latinos or their culture.
5. Of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church.

[Middle English, from Old French and from Old English lǣden, both from Latin Latīnus, from Latium, an ancient country of west-central Italy.]

Latin

(ˈlætɪn)
n
1. (Languages) the language of ancient Rome and the Roman Empire and of the educated in medieval Europe, which achieved its classical form during the 1st century bc. Having originally been the language of Latium, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family, it later formed the basis of the Romance group. See Late Latin, Low Latin, Medieval Latin, New Latin, Old Latin See also Romance
2. (Historical Terms) the language of ancient Rome and the Roman Empire and of the educated in medieval Europe, which achieved its classical form during the 1st century bc. Having originally been the language of Latium, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family, it later formed the basis of the Romance group. See Late Latin, Low Latin, Medieval Latin, New Latin, Old Latin See also Romance
3. (Peoples) a member of any of those peoples whose languages are derived from Latin
4. (Peoples) an inhabitant of ancient Latium
adj
5. (Languages) of or relating to the Latin language, the ancient Latins, or Latium
6. (Peoples) characteristic of or relating to those peoples in Europe and Latin America whose languages are derived from Latin
7. (Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church
8. (Linguistics) denoting or relating to the Roman alphabet
[Old English latin and læden Latin, language, from Latin Latīnus of Latium]

Lat•in

(ˈlæt n)

n.
1. the Italic language of ancient Rome, maintained through the Middle Ages and into modern times as the liturgical language of Western Christianity and an international language of learned discourse. Abbr.: L
2.
a. a member of any people speaking a language descended from Latin.
b. a native or inhabitant of any country in Latin America; Latin American.
3. a native or inhabitant of Latium.
4. a member of the Latin Church.
adj.
5.
b. of or pertaining to any of the peoples of Europe or the New World speaking languages descended from Latin.
6. of or pertaining to the Latin Church.
7. of or pertaining to Latium or its inhabitants.
8. of or pertaining to the Latin alphabet.
[before 950; Middle English, Old English < Latin Latīnus. See Latium, -ine1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
res gestae - things done
hybrid, loanblend, loan-blend - a word that is composed of parts from different languages (e.g., `monolingual' has a Greek prefix and a Latin root)
Italic language, Italic - a branch of the Indo-European languages of which Latin is the chief representative
Old Latin - the oldest recorded Latin (dating back at early as the 6th century B.C.)
classical Latin - the language of educated people in ancient Rome; "Latin is a language as dead as dead can be. It killed the ancient Romans--and now it's killing me"
Low Latin - any dialect of Latin other than the classical
Biblical Latin, Late Latin - the form of Latin written between the 3rd and 8th centuries
Neo-Latin, New Latin - Latin since the Renaissance; used for scientific nomenclature
Latinian language, Romance language, Romance - the group of languages derived from Latin
nihil - (Latin) nil; nothing (as used by a sheriff after an unsuccessful effort to serve a writ); "nihil habet"
annum - (Latin) year; "per annum"
de novo - from the beginning
A.M., ante meridiem - before noon; "let's meet at 11 A.M."
P.M., post meridiem - between noon and midnight; "let's meet at 8 P.M."
2.Latin - an inhabitant of ancient Latium
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
3.Latin - a person who is a member of those peoples whose languages derived from Latin
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.Latin - of or relating to the ancient Latins or the Latin language; "Latin verb conjugations"
2.Latin - relating to people or countries speaking Romance languages; "Latin America"
3.Latin - relating to languages derived from Latin; "Romance languages"
4.Latin - of or relating to the ancient region of Latium; "Latin towns"
Translations
اللغَة اللاتينيَّهلاتِينِّيٌّلاتيني
latinalatinskýŘímanRománLatin
latinlatin-latinerlatinskromer
latialatinaLatinoromiaromiano
latinalatinalainenlatinalaisamerikkalainenlatinan kieliroomalainen
latinskilatinski jeziklatinštinaLatinlatinički
latin
latínamaîur af rómönsku òjóîerni
ラテン語
라틴어
lotynų kalbaLotynų AmerikaLotynų Amerikos
latīņulatīņu valodaromāņu valodās runājošo tautu pārstāvis
łacinałacińskirzymskijęzyk łaciński
latinčinalatinskýRomán
latinščina
latinlatinsk
ภาษาละติน
LatinLâtinLatinceLâtinceRomalı
tiếng Latin

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
A. ADJlatino
B. N
1. (= person) → latino/a m/f
the Latinslos latinos
2. (Ling) → latín m
C. CPD Latin lover Ngalán m latino
Latin quarter Nbarrio m latino

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
n
(= language) → latin m
I do Latin → Je fais du latin.
(= person from Mediterranean country) → latin(e) m/f
adj
(= Mediterranean) [country] → latin(e)
(= South American) [country] → latino-américain(e)
[music] → latin(e), latino-américain(e)Latin America nAmérique f latine
in Latin America → en Amérique latineLatin American
adj [country, government, leader, affairs, history] → latino-américain(e)
nLatino-Américain(e) m/fLatin quarter n
the Latin quarter → le quartier latin

Latin

adj
(= Roman) civilization, worldrömisch; poets, literaturerömisch, lateinisch; Latin languagelateinische Sprache; (= of ancient Latium)latinische Sprache
(= of Roman origin)romanisch; temperament, charmsüdländisch
n
(= inhabitant of ancient Latium)Latiner(in) m(f); (= Roman)Römer(in) m(f); (= a member of any Latin race)Südländer(in) m(f), → Romane m, → Romanin f
(Ling) → Latein(isch) nt

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
1. adj (language, temperament) → latino/a; (textbook, scholar, lessons) → di latino
2. n (language) → latino

Latin

(ˈlӕtin) noun, adjective
1. (of) the language spoken in ancient Rome. We studied Latin at school; a Latin lesson.
2. (a person) who speaks a language derived from Latin.
Latin America
the countries of Central and South America, where the official language is usually a form of either Spanish or Portuguese.
Latin American noun, adjective

Latin

لاتِينِّيٌّ latina latin Latein Λατίνος latín latinan kieli latin latinski latino ラテン語 라틴어 Latijn latin łacina latim латынь latin ภาษาละติน Latin tiếng Latin 拉丁文
References in classic literature ?
Jo remembered the kind old gentleman, who used to let her build railroads and bridges with his big dictionaries, tell her stories about queer pictures in his Latin books, and buy her cards of gingerbread whenever he met her in the street.
I sat at home with the old people in the evenings now, reading Latin that was not in our high-school course.
No--I reckon one o' them fancy groups--one o' them Latin goddesses that Fairfax is always gassin' about, sorter leadin', directin' and bossin' us where to dig.
Latin from the books of the Laws of England, which taken along with the context, means, that of all whales captured by anybody on the coast of that land, the King, as Honorary Grand Harpooneer, must have the head, and the Queen be respectfully presented with the tail.
He struck a few majestic chords, and began singing that grand old Latin piece, the "Dies Irae.
The word is from the Latin villa which together with via, a way, or more anciently ved and vella, Varro derives from veho, to carry, because the villa is the place to and from which things are carried.
Under the old dim writing of the Yankee historian appeared traces of a penmanship which was older and dimmer still -- Latin words and sentences: fragments from old monk- ish legends, evidently.
For instance, he does not merely read and write Greek, but speaks it; the same with the Latin.
Back of those men's time the English are just simply foreigners, nothing more, nothing less; they talk Danish, German, Norman French, and sometimes a mixture of all three; back of THEM, they talk Latin, and ancient British, Irish, and Gaelic; and then back of these come billions and billions of pure savages that talk a gibberish that Satan himself couldn't understand.
I wanted to tell her yesterday it was her place to teach me Latin, not manners.
Then they seemed so familiar with French names and French authors: but my amazement reached its climax when Miss Temple asked Helen if she sometimes snatched a moment to recall the Latin her father had taught her, and taking a book from a shelf, bade her read and construe a page of Virgil; and Helen obeyed, my organ of veneration expanding at every sounding line.
You could not open a book in this library that I have not looked into, and got something out of also: unless it be that range of Greek and Latin, and that of French; and those I know one from another: it is as much as you can expect of a poor man's daughter.