Latinism


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Lat·in·ism

 (lăt′n-ĭz′əm)
n.
An idiom, structure, or word derived from or suggestive of Latin.

Latinism

(ˈlætɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a word, idiom, or phrase borrowed from Latin

Lat•in•ism

(ˈlæt nˌɪz əm)

n.
a mode of expression derived from or imitative of Latin.
[1560–70; < Medieval Latin]

Latinism

1. a mode of expression imitative of Latin.
2. a Latin word, phrase, or expression that of ten appears in another lan-guage. — Latinize, v.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Latinism - a word or phrase borrowed from Latin
loanword, loan - a word borrowed from another language; e.g. `blitz' is a German word borrowed into modern English
Translations

latinism

[ˈlætɪnɪzəm] Nlatinismo m

latinism

nLatinismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
As his name is a Latinism for Santa he must have thought all his Christmases had come at once.
The term 'lex sportiva' is not a pure Latinism, since the adjective 'sportiva' is not Latin, the term 'lex sportiva' obviously was created by analogy with lex mercatoria; see generally, Boris Kolev, 'Lex Sportiva and Lex Mercatoria'.
to align with this useful but inapplicable Latinism and with the private
That Latinism would have evoked, in readers of Blackwood's Magazine, from which it comes, images of convivial evenings of shared literary, perhaps bibulous, pleasures--high cultural moments in a Scottish idiom.
As Hammond and DelVecchio also say, "By Jove, I am not Oedipus enough / To understand this Sphinx" in Sejanus may have suggested the MS's "Not all the wit I am commander of / Can make me a wise Oedipus and unvolve / The mystery of your Sphinx" (18-20), though the parallel is slightly less close than those, noted in my list of rare phrases and collocations, with Brome's The Novella (1632) and Massinger's The Roman Actor (1626)--which each include "dissolved," to which the MS's "unvolve" has an aural resemblance--and in Mason's The Turk (1607), where "unfold" is similar in meaning to the MS's odd Latinism (from volvere, "to roll").
where "bard" is put into the Latin vocative case, as the "e" ending shows, although this case is an example of Latinism in the Hungarian language.
could apparently pass for a Latinism, was erroneously never re-reversed.
On the basis of these micro-analyses, the author describes Laguna as a contradictory character echoing in fact the divergent tendencies of Renaissance: a strong interest for classical sources and the birth of textual criticism, an interest for the studia humanitatis and the writing of practical works, a high level of scholarship and the production of medical works without erudite ambition, a classicist Latinism and the rise of vernacular languages (Laguna), a strong personality and a silent use of others' works (Fuentes).
The very obscurity of the Latinism should give you a sense of how daunting a task the research into customary international law is.
9); the everyday verb 'dar' instead of the Latinism which 'profertur' might have suggested and the avoidance of the Latin word-order (v.
Similarly, the Latinism and etymologies at the head of each item in the brief urinary imply a learned professional context (leaving aside the affiliations of the text -- many of the other copies appear in books certainly intended for professional practitioners).