Latinism


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Lat·in·ism

 (lăt′n-ĭz′əm)
n.
An idiom, structure, or word derived from or suggestive of Latin.

Latinism

(ˈlætɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a word, idiom, or phrase borrowed from Latin

Lat•in•ism

(ˈlæt nˌɪz əm)

n.
a mode of expression derived from or imitative of Latin.
[1560–70; < Medieval Latin]

Latinism

1. a mode of expression imitative of Latin.
2. a Latin word, phrase, or expression that of ten appears in another lan-guage. — Latinize, v.
See also: Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Latinism - a word or phrase borrowed from Latin
loanword, loan - a word borrowed from another language; e.g. `blitz' is a German word borrowed into modern English
Translations

latinism

[ˈlætɪnɪzəm] Nlatinismo m

latinism

nLatinismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
It was also on this mission that Leoni displayed his Atenean Latinism (at that time Latin was still taught) by being very interested in Latin words still used for student facilities, like mensa for the dinning hall.
to the man'] is shortened from the LATINISM argumentum ad hominem ( = an argument directed not to the merits of an opponent's argument but to the personality or character of the opponent).
As his name is a Latinism for Santa he must have thought all his Christmases had come at once.
The term 'lex sportiva' is not a pure Latinism, since the adjective 'sportiva' is not Latin, the term 'lex sportiva' obviously was created by analogy with lex mercatoria; see generally, Boris Kolev, 'Lex Sportiva and Lex Mercatoria'.
Going a bit off-track: the Latinism lira also appears in the etymology of delirium, so we might think of learning as occurring when someone stays on track and delirium as a sign of being off-track).
That Latinism would have evoked, in readers of Blackwood's Magazine, from which it comes, images of convivial evenings of shared literary, perhaps bibulous, pleasures--high cultural moments in a Scottish idiom.
According to Vladimir Vodov, the title gosudar' is a semantic Latinism, translated in Ruthenian chanceries and penetrating in this way into the political vocabulary of Muscovy in the 1430s.
It is my conjecture that the frequent Latinism of the age was no mere high-sounding gratification, no mere stratagem for swelling the page, but rather an eagerness to achieve universality and clarity.
where "bard" is put into the Latin vocative case, as the "e" ending shows, although this case is an example of Latinism in the Hungarian language.
As Hammond and DelVecchio also say, "By Jove, I am not Oedipus enough / To understand this Sphinx" in Sejanus may have suggested the MS's "Not all the wit I am commander of / Can make me a wise Oedipus and unvolve / The mystery of your Sphinx" (18-20), though the parallel is slightly less close than those, noted in my list of rare phrases and collocations, with Brome's The Novella (1632) and Massinger's The Roman Actor (1626)--which each include "dissolved," to which the MS's "unvolve" has an aural resemblance--and in Mason's The Turk (1607), where "unfold" is similar in meaning to the MS's odd Latinism (from volvere, "to roll").
Just as in the Commedia there are numerous instances in which words and syntactical constructions are plainly modelled on Latin, such as the Latinism 'sale' [sea] in Par.
could apparently pass for a Latinism, was erroneously never re-reversed.