Latin

(redirected from Latinisms)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Lat·in

 (lăt′n)
n.
1.
a. The Indo-European language of the ancient Latins and Romans and the most important cultural language of western Europe until the end of the 17th century.
b. The Latin language and literature from the end of the third century bc to the end of the second century ad.
2.
a. A member of a Latin people, especially a native or inhabitant of Latin America.
b. A Latino or Latina.
3. A native or resident of ancient Latium.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or composed in Latin: a Latin scholar; Latin verse.
2.
a. Of or relating to ancient Rome, its people, or its culture.
b. Of or relating to Latium, its people, or its culture.
3. Of or relating to the languages that developed from Latin, such as Italian, French, Spanish, and Portuguese, or to the peoples that speak them.
4.
a. Of or relating to the peoples, countries, or cultures of Latin America.
b. Of or relating to Latinos or their culture.
5. Of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church.

[Middle English, from Old French and from Old English lǣden, both from Latin Latīnus, from Latium, an ancient country of west-central Italy.]

Latin

(ˈlætɪn)
n
1. (Languages) the language of ancient Rome and the Roman Empire and of the educated in medieval Europe, which achieved its classical form during the 1st century bc. Having originally been the language of Latium, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family, it later formed the basis of the Romance group. See Late Latin, Low Latin, Medieval Latin, New Latin, Old Latin See also Romance
2. (Historical Terms) the language of ancient Rome and the Roman Empire and of the educated in medieval Europe, which achieved its classical form during the 1st century bc. Having originally been the language of Latium, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family, it later formed the basis of the Romance group. See Late Latin, Low Latin, Medieval Latin, New Latin, Old Latin See also Romance
3. (Peoples) a member of any of those peoples whose languages are derived from Latin
4. (Peoples) an inhabitant of ancient Latium
adj
5. (Languages) of or relating to the Latin language, the ancient Latins, or Latium
6. (Peoples) characteristic of or relating to those peoples in Europe and Latin America whose languages are derived from Latin
7. (Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church
8. (Linguistics) denoting or relating to the Roman alphabet
[Old English latin and læden Latin, language, from Latin Latīnus of Latium]

Lat•in

(ˈlæt n)

n.
1. the Italic language of ancient Rome, maintained through the Middle Ages and into modern times as the liturgical language of Western Christianity and an international language of learned discourse. Abbr.: L
2.
a. a member of any people speaking a language descended from Latin.
b. a native or inhabitant of any country in Latin America; Latin American.
3. a native or inhabitant of Latium.
4. a member of the Latin Church.
adj.
5.
b. of or pertaining to any of the peoples of Europe or the New World speaking languages descended from Latin.
6. of or pertaining to the Latin Church.
7. of or pertaining to Latium or its inhabitants.
8. of or pertaining to the Latin alphabet.
[before 950; Middle English, Old English < Latin Latīnus. See Latium, -ine1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
res gestae - things done
hybrid, loanblend, loan-blend - a word that is composed of parts from different languages (e.g., `monolingual' has a Greek prefix and a Latin root)
Italic language, Italic - a branch of the Indo-European languages of which Latin is the chief representative
Old Latin - the oldest recorded Latin (dating back at early as the 6th century B.C.)
classical Latin - the language of educated people in ancient Rome; "Latin is a language as dead as dead can be. It killed the ancient Romans--and now it's killing me"
Low Latin - any dialect of Latin other than the classical
Biblical Latin, Late Latin - the form of Latin written between the 3rd and 8th centuries
Neo-Latin, New Latin - Latin since the Renaissance; used for scientific nomenclature
Latinian language, Romance language, Romance - the group of languages derived from Latin
nihil - (Latin) nil; nothing (as used by a sheriff after an unsuccessful effort to serve a writ); "nihil habet"
annum - (Latin) year; "per annum"
de novo - from the beginning
A.M., ante meridiem - before noon; "let's meet at 11 A.M."
P.M., post meridiem - between noon and midnight; "let's meet at 8 P.M."
2.Latin - an inhabitant of ancient Latium
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
3.Latin - a person who is a member of those peoples whose languages derived from Latin
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.Latin - of or relating to the ancient Latins or the Latin language; "Latin verb conjugations"
2.Latin - relating to people or countries speaking Romance languages; "Latin America"
3.Latin - relating to languages derived from Latin; "Romance languages"
4.Latin - of or relating to the ancient region of Latium; "Latin towns"
Translations
اللغَة اللاتينيَّهلاتِينِّيٌّلاتيني
latinalatinskýŘímanRománLatin
latinlatin-latinerlatinskromer
latialatinaLatinoromiaromiano
latinalatinalainenlatinalaisamerikkalainenlatinan kieliroomalainen
latinskilatinski jeziklatinštinaLatinlatinički
latin
latínamaîur af rómönsku òjóîerni
ラテン語
라틴어
lotynų kalbaLotynų AmerikaLotynų Amerikos
latīņulatīņu valodaromāņu valodās runājošo tautu pārstāvis
łacinałacińskirzymskijęzyk łaciński
latinčinalatinskýRomán
latinščina
latinlatinsk
ภาษาละติน
LatinLâtinLatinceLâtinceRomalı
tiếng Latin

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
A. ADJlatino
B. N
1. (= person) → latino/a m/f
the Latinslos latinos
2. (Ling) → latín m
C. CPD Latin lover Ngalán m latino
Latin quarter Nbarrio m latino

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
n
(= language) → latin m
I do Latin → Je fais du latin.
(= person from Mediterranean country) → latin(e) m/f
adj
(= Mediterranean) [country] → latin(e)
(= South American) [country] → latino-américain(e)
[music] → latin(e), latino-américain(e)Latin America nAmérique f latine
in Latin America → en Amérique latineLatin American
adj [country, government, leader, affairs, history] → latino-américain(e)
nLatino-Américain(e) m/fLatin quarter n
the Latin quarter → le quartier latin

Latin

adj
(= Roman) civilization, worldrömisch; poets, literaturerömisch, lateinisch; Latin languagelateinische Sprache; (= of ancient Latium)latinische Sprache
(= of Roman origin)romanisch; temperament, charmsüdländisch
n
(= inhabitant of ancient Latium)Latiner(in) m(f); (= Roman)Römer(in) m(f); (= a member of any Latin race)Südländer(in) m(f), → Romane m, → Romanin f
(Ling) → Latein(isch) nt

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
1. adj (language, temperament) → latino/a; (textbook, scholar, lessons) → di latino
2. n (language) → latino

Latin

(ˈlӕtin) noun, adjective
1. (of) the language spoken in ancient Rome. We studied Latin at school; a Latin lesson.
2. (a person) who speaks a language derived from Latin.
Latin America
the countries of Central and South America, where the official language is usually a form of either Spanish or Portuguese.
Latin American noun, adjective

Latin

لاتِينِّيٌّ latina latin Latein Λατίνος latín latinan kieli latin latinski latino ラテン語 라틴어 Latijn latin łacina latim латынь latin ภาษาละติน Latin tiếng Latin 拉丁文
References in periodicals archive ?
Latinisms can be observed in this sonnet, such as exempli, defecto for colma, and honesta for dignitosa.
But Maxwell's giving repeated space to Powers's stories of the Midwest was a Catholic triumph because those stories were so explicitly Catholic, mattering not at all that the priests in them were "grasping, blinkered, striving, prone to musty Latinisms," to use Paul Elie's words again.
Today we have a plethora of Latinisms such as "alumnus, alumna, alumni and alumnae" instead.
To be sure: Scott pokes a lot of fun at Oldbuck and his Latinisms, and at the way in which he transmutes every situation into learned disputation and ends up setting forth to meet the Napoleonic army with a twelfth-century sword.
The Lydgatian strand of reception had also cast Chaucer's pure vernacular as a language of stylistic luxuriousness, distinguished for its polysyllabic Latinisms, its highly wrought conceits and its scholarly sophistication.
EV is usually described as extremely literal and charged with introducing numerous Latinisms into the English language (Condit 1882: 64-73, Delisle and Woodsworth 1995: 32, Norton 2000: 7, Daniell 2003: 76-80).
Latinisms in the act of wrinting Sermo latinus in scribendi actu
Morgana lingers on the figure of Bonvesin de la Riva and his writings in Latin (De Magnalibus Urbis Mediolani) and in cultivated volgare, embellished with Latinisms and Provencalisms.
1855, 2023 (1985); 'approbate and reprobate' (for accept and reject) are Latinisms that Leff called "insufferably fancy," id.
Latinisms (such as "ambit," "de minimis," "eiusdem generis," "sub silentio"); legal cliches (such as "plain meaning," "strict scrutiny," "instant case," "totality of circumstances," "abuse of discretion," "facial adequacy," "facial challenge," "chilling effect," "canons of construction," "gravamen," and "implicates" in such expressions as "the statute implicates First Amendment concerns"); legal terms that have an ambulatory rather than a fixed meaning (such as "rational basis" and "proximate cause"); incurably vague "feel good" terms such as "justice" and "fairness"; pomposities such as "it is axiomatic that"; insincere verbal curtsies ("with all due respect," or "I respectfully dissent"); and gruesome juxtapositions (such as "Roe and its progeny," meaning Roe v.
He covers public speaking, preparation/anticipating the speaker, complex syntax/compression, word order/clusters, general adverbial clauses, untranslatability, figures of speech, argumentation, formal style, diction/register, formal policy addresses, economic and political discourse, quotations/allusions/transposition, humor, Latinisms, numbers, and note-taking.
The only cases where the persistence of "i" can be seen are in litera (I: 5) and the Latinisms inter (VI: 23); intra (III: 9).