Latin

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Lat·in

 (lăt′n)
n.
1.
a. The Indo-European language of the ancient Latins and Romans and the most important cultural language of western Europe until the end of the 17th century.
b. The Latin language and literature from the end of the third century bc to the end of the second century ad.
2.
a. A member of a Latin people, especially a native or inhabitant of Latin America.
b. A Latino or Latina.
3. A native or resident of ancient Latium.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or composed in Latin: a Latin scholar; Latin verse.
2.
a. Of or relating to ancient Rome, its people, or its culture.
b. Of or relating to Latium, its people, or its culture.
3. Of or relating to the languages that developed from Latin, such as Italian, French, Spanish, and Portuguese, or to the peoples that speak them.
4.
a. Of or relating to the peoples, countries, or cultures of Latin America.
b. Of or relating to Latinos or their culture.
5. Of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church.

[Middle English, from Old French and from Old English lǣden, both from Latin Latīnus, from Latium, an ancient country of west-central Italy.]

Latin

(ˈlætɪn)
n
1. (Languages) the language of ancient Rome and the Roman Empire and of the educated in medieval Europe, which achieved its classical form during the 1st century bc. Having originally been the language of Latium, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family, it later formed the basis of the Romance group. See Late Latin, Low Latin, Medieval Latin, New Latin, Old Latin See also Romance
2. (Historical Terms) the language of ancient Rome and the Roman Empire and of the educated in medieval Europe, which achieved its classical form during the 1st century bc. Having originally been the language of Latium, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European family, it later formed the basis of the Romance group. See Late Latin, Low Latin, Medieval Latin, New Latin, Old Latin See also Romance
3. (Peoples) a member of any of those peoples whose languages are derived from Latin
4. (Peoples) an inhabitant of ancient Latium
adj
5. (Languages) of or relating to the Latin language, the ancient Latins, or Latium
6. (Peoples) characteristic of or relating to those peoples in Europe and Latin America whose languages are derived from Latin
7. (Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church
8. (Linguistics) denoting or relating to the Roman alphabet
[Old English latin and læden Latin, language, from Latin Latīnus of Latium]

Lat•in

(ˈlæt n)

n.
1. the Italic language of ancient Rome, maintained through the Middle Ages and into modern times as the liturgical language of Western Christianity and an international language of learned discourse. Abbr.: L
2.
a. a member of any people speaking a language descended from Latin.
b. a native or inhabitant of any country in Latin America; Latin American.
3. a native or inhabitant of Latium.
4. a member of the Latin Church.
adj.
5.
b. of or pertaining to any of the peoples of Europe or the New World speaking languages descended from Latin.
6. of or pertaining to the Latin Church.
7. of or pertaining to Latium or its inhabitants.
8. of or pertaining to the Latin alphabet.
[before 950; Middle English, Old English < Latin Latīnus. See Latium, -ine1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
res gestae - things done
hybrid, loanblend, loan-blend - a word that is composed of parts from different languages (e.g., `monolingual' has a Greek prefix and a Latin root)
Italic language, Italic - a branch of the Indo-European languages of which Latin is the chief representative
Old Latin - the oldest recorded Latin (dating back at early as the 6th century B.C.)
classical Latin - the language of educated people in ancient Rome; "Latin is a language as dead as dead can be. It killed the ancient Romans--and now it's killing me"
Low Latin - any dialect of Latin other than the classical
Biblical Latin, Late Latin - the form of Latin written between the 3rd and 8th centuries
Neo-Latin, New Latin - Latin since the Renaissance; used for scientific nomenclature
Latinian language, Romance language, Romance - the group of languages derived from Latin
nihil - (Latin) nil; nothing (as used by a sheriff after an unsuccessful effort to serve a writ); "nihil habet"
annum - (Latin) year; "per annum"
de novo - from the beginning
A.M., ante meridiem - before noon; "let's meet at 11 A.M."
P.M., post meridiem - between noon and midnight; "let's meet at 8 P.M."
2.Latin - an inhabitant of ancient Latium
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
3.Latin - a person who is a member of those peoples whose languages derived from Latin
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.Latin - of or relating to the ancient Latins or the Latin language; "Latin verb conjugations"
2.Latin - relating to people or countries speaking Romance languages; "Latin America"
3.Latin - relating to languages derived from Latin; "Romance languages"
4.Latin - of or relating to the ancient region of Latium; "Latin towns"
Translations
اللغَة اللاتينيَّهلاتِينِّيٌّلاتيني
latinalatinskýŘímanRománLatin
latinlatin-latinerlatinskromer
latialatinaLatinoromiaromiano
latinalatinalainenlatinalaisamerikkalainenlatinan kieliroomalainen
latinskilatinski jeziklatinštinaLatinlatinički
latin
latínamaîur af rómönsku òjóîerni
ラテン語
라틴어
lotynų kalbaLotynų AmerikaLotynų Amerikos
latīņulatīņu valodaromāņu valodās runājošo tautu pārstāvis
łacinałacińskirzymskijęzyk łaciński
latinčinalatinskýRomán
latinščina
latinlatinsk
ภาษาละติน
LatinLâtinLatinceLâtinceRomalı
tiếng Latin

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
A. ADJlatino
B. N
1. (= person) → latino/a m/f
the Latinslos latinos
2. (Ling) → latín m
C. CPD Latin lover Ngalán m latino
Latin quarter Nbarrio m latino

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
n
(= language) → latin m
I do Latin → Je fais du latin.
(= person from Mediterranean country) → latin(e) m/f
adj
(= Mediterranean) [country] → latin(e)
(= South American) [country] → latino-américain(e)
[music] → latin(e), latino-américain(e)Latin America nAmérique f latine
in Latin America → en Amérique latineLatin American
adj [country, government, leader, affairs, history] → latino-américain(e)
nLatino-Américain(e) m/fLatin quarter n
the Latin quarter → le quartier latin

Latin

adj
(= Roman) civilization, worldrömisch; poets, literaturerömisch, lateinisch; Latin languagelateinische Sprache; (= of ancient Latium)latinische Sprache
(= of Roman origin)romanisch; temperament, charmsüdländisch
n
(= inhabitant of ancient Latium)Latiner(in) m(f); (= Roman)Römer(in) m(f); (= a member of any Latin race)Südländer(in) m(f), → Romane m, → Romanin f
(Ling) → Latein(isch) nt

Latin

[ˈlætɪn]
1. adj (language, temperament) → latino/a; (textbook, scholar, lessons) → di latino
2. n (language) → latino

Latin

(ˈlӕtin) noun, adjective
1. (of) the language spoken in ancient Rome. We studied Latin at school; a Latin lesson.
2. (a person) who speaks a language derived from Latin.
Latin America
the countries of Central and South America, where the official language is usually a form of either Spanish or Portuguese.
Latin American noun, adjective

Latin

لاتِينِّيٌّ latina latin Latein Λατίνος latín latinan kieli latin latinski latino ラテン語 라틴어 Latijn latin łacina latim латынь latin ภาษาละติน Latin tiếng Latin 拉丁文
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Finally I should note that it is a tribute to the translator's modesty that one of the preeminent Latinists of our day would go for help to younger scholars for material that falls beyond her areas of expertise.
When passages from Calvin, Scaliger, or Erasmus in modern English jostle passages from vernacular writers with all the flavour of their period about them, it is fatally easy to get the feeling that the Latinists are somehow more enlightened, less remote, less limited by their age, than those who wrote English.
Written by world-renowned Latinists, Milena Minkova and Terence Tunberg, and drawing on the authors specialty, this outstanding series features an oral activity in each chapter.
In this 2014 Introduction, Pujante and Cerda provide interesting observations related to issues such as the percentage of Anglicists, Hispanists and comparatists and even Latinists writing on Shakespeare in the last quarter of the 20th century (XXXVI), or the statistics of publications per decade and numbers of doctoral dissertations in different periods, all showing an increase related to the development and expansion of English Studies in Spain since the 1950s.
It cannot be ascertained for certain to which particular treatises on letter-writing Nahua Latinists had access, but many of Erasmus' recommendations in his celebrated De conscribendis epistolis of 1522 were reproduced verbatim in Fray Maturino Gilberti's Grammatica Maturini printed in Mexico City in 1559.
Yup, the Pope has a special Latin twitter account for the Latinists of the world.
He provided a valuable corrective to the traditional and highly overdetermined counterpoints (especially Latinists vs.
No," responded the Vatican Latinist, "it's always the same thought, but we do have a latitude of freedom as Latinists because we want to put it in language that is properly Latin, so not simply just a slavish translation from English or Italian or whatever language the tweet happens to originally be in.
Among scholars literate in Latin, the book will be important for Renaissance Latinists, students of the history of rhetoric, the history of natural philosophy, and Jesuit scholarship (Palfrey's curriculum was largely Jesuit).
Illustrious Latinists like Robert Fitzgerald have pointed to the unprecedented originality of Virgil's poetic representation of history as prophecy ("Postscript" to Virgil 1983, 405-406).
11) Thus Heywood: 'thys our englishe toong (as many thinke and J here fynde) is farre vnable, to compare with the latten', Preface to Troas 7; and Alexander Nevyle, translator of the Oedipus, in his Preface asked readers to 'consider the grosenes of our owne Country language, which can by no means aspire to the high lofty latinists stile' (Newton 1581:191).
Based on records made by philologists and latinists, it is demonstrated that the similarity between these two clause types is the result of a grammaticalization process where the conditional clause passed from the adverbial function to a complement function in Latin, due to the extinction of the interrogative particles that were replaced by the Latin conditional conjunction si.