Latinity


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La·tin·i·ty

 (lə-tĭn′ĭ-tē)
n.
1. The manner in which Latin is used in speaking or writing.
2. Latin quality or character: Her speech was marked by florid Latinity.
3. A Latinism.
4. Latin literature: This concept is not found in all of Latinity.

Latinity

(ləˈtɪnɪtɪ)
n
1. facility in the use of Latin
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) Latin style, esp in literature

La•tin•i•ty

(ləˈtɪn ɪ ti)

n.
1. knowledge or use of the Latin language.
2. Latin style or idiom.
[1610–20; < Latin]

Latinity

1. a particular way of speaking or writing Latin.
2. the use or knowledge of Latin.
See also: Language
Translations

latinity

[ləˈtɪnɪtɪ] Nlatinidad f

latinity

n (rare)Latinität f
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
You must tell it, sir, in a sound Latinity when your scholarship is riper; or in English if you please, though for my part I prefer the stronger tongue.
Here the commandment-giving God of the Old Testament is put forth as evidence of the imperialistic, dominating, un-Greek quality of Latinity, again suggesting the affinity between Latinity and Judaism, a suggestion also to be found in Nietzsche and Bertram.
Such failings are perhaps bound up with the book's virtues--but not so its dubious Latinity.
The objection to the Latinity is not a very serious one.
While the baroque Latinity in this passage parodies mathematical language, Tristram's commentary is not on the content of Toby's study per se, but on the impossibility of its fulfillment.
The articles of the first group all consider the intersections of Latinity and use of vernacular with questions of orthodoxy.
The editors contend that the Latinity of the treatise is superior to other systematic theologies of the time, a "fact" which "proves" Milton wrote it.
An outpouring of support for waiting and reconsidering the translations, he wrote, might convince those who "have decided that Latinity is more important than lucidity" to listen to the people in the pews and reevaluate their position.
80) Poor latinity is not uncommon in the confessional letters (the English publicity documents are noticeably "cleaner"), as letters are misread, words run together, and abbreviations ignored.
Section 3, Opinion leader: fra tempo e storia ("Opinion Leader: Between Time and History"), collects the essays of Ron Witt, "La concezione della storia in Petrarca" ("The Conception of History in Petrarch"), Christopher Celenza, "Petrarca, il latino e la latinita nel Rinascimento italiano" ("Petrarch, Latin, and Latinity in the Italian Renaissance"), Giuseppe Mazzotta, "Petrarca e il Discorso di Roma" ("Petrarch and the Discourse of Rome"), and Margaret King, "Petrarca, le prime scrittrici umaniste e la coscienza dell' io" ("Petrarch, the First Humanist Female Writers, and the Consciousness of I").
kind of "cosmopolitan" Latinity derived from the assimilation
She does not attribute these works' lack of success to their Latinity, nor does she see the fault as lying with their subject matter.