Laudianism


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Laudianism

the policies and practices of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury and opponent of Puritanism, especially his assertion that the Church of England preserves more fully than the Roman communion the orthodoxy of the early Christian church, his support of the divine right of kings and bishops, and his infiuence upon an architecture blending Gothic and Renaissance motifs. — Laudian, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
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McDowell insists that Laudianism "should itself be seen as a heterodox, minority movement in relation to the Calvinist orthodoxy of early Stuart England" (9) but his arguments about Milton's own religious beliefs remain somewhat inconclusive.
However, it is also an accident of history, which terminated the style associated with Laudianism "before it had time to settle in its conventions satisfactorily" (99).
Six chronologically organized chapters summarize the effects of the early Reformation, Mary Tudor's Counter-Reformation, the Elizabethan Settlement, late sixteenth-century inflation, Puritanism, and Laudianism on the music of provincial cathedrals and college chapels.
There was an "empathetic link between Laudianism and a certain strand of contemporary Catholicism" (495) that would in the end do Charles's reputation among zealous Protestants no good at all.
The nineteenth-century editors of Andrewes's works were caught up in the new Laudianism of the Oxford Movement, which also influenced Eliot.
In the 1650s he successfully "decouple[d] Arminianism from Laudianism, and show[ed] that [it] was .
In the end, he sketches out a "subversive" Puritanism at play in Norwich culture, whose adherents become alienated by the Laudianism of the Caroline Church.
Similarly, the Virgin Mary makes a reappearance in "metaphysical" poetry, as does even Teresa of Avila--in the poetry of Richard Crashaw, who eventually went all the way from high Laudianism to Roma.
Macmillan, 1984]; Walsham, "The Parochial Roots of Laudianism Revisited," Journal of Ecclesiastical History 49 [1998]).
In Herrick's poems about diminutive fairies, the "active royalism" [44] of his panegyric mode and the Laudianism of his devotional and festive verses are mocked.
Both persisted through the seventeenth century despite intermittent attempts to impose Episcopalian organization and also forms of worship closer to the Church of England, notably the commitment to bishops by the early Stuarts and the disastrous attempt to force Laudianism on Scotland in 1637-38.
If this looks like the leading edge of Laudianism or Arminianism or anti-Calvinism, it reversed direction with James's accession.