Roman law

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Roman law

n.
1. The legal system of ancient Rome, which influenced modern Western legal systems.
2. The civil law compiled by the emperor Justinian, which remains a source for modern European law.

Roman law

n
1. (Law) the system of jurisprudence of ancient Rome, codified under Justinian and forming the basis of many modern legal systems
2. (Law) another term for civil law

Ro′man law′


n.
the system of jurisprudence elaborated by the ancient Romans, a strong and varied influence on the legal systems of many countries.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Roman law - the legal code of ancient RomeRoman law - the legal code of ancient Rome; codified under Justinian; the basis for many modern systems of civil law
addiction - (Roman law) a formal award by a magistrate of a thing or person to another person (as the award of a debtor to his creditor); a surrender to a master; "under Roman law addiction was the justification for slavery"
legal code - a code of laws adopted by a state or nation; "a code of laws"
novate - replace with something new, especially an old obligation by a new one
stipulate - make an oral contract or agreement in the verbal form of question and answer that is necessary to give it legal force
References in periodicals archive ?
The brief noted that "various documents and texts" figured in the development of American law, among them English common and statutory law, Roman law, the civil law of continental Europe and private international law.
This excludes, for the most part, civil law traditions in francophone countries and hybrid legal systems such as Cameroon or South Africa, which contain a hodgepodge of customary law, Roman Dutch law, common law, and civil law.
But second, that justification also went hand in hand with a series of selective and misogynist readings (or misreadings in some cases) of the early Church fathers, Church law, Roman law, Greek philosophy, and scripture that would be incorporated into the major textbooks as the standard university curriculum.