maritime law

(redirected from Law of the sea)
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Related to Law of the sea: maritime law, UNCLOS
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maritime law - the branch of international law that deals with territorial and international waters or with shipping or with ocean fishery etc.
barratry - (maritime law) a fraudulent breach of duty by the master of a ship that injures the owner of the ship or its cargo; includes every breach of trust such as stealing or sinking or deserting the ship or embezzling the cargo
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
international law, law of nations - the body of laws governing relations between nations
Translations
derecho marítimo

maritime law

ndiritto marittimo
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, coastal nations are allowed economic control of the waters and seabed up to 200 nautical miles from their shores.
The Republic of Cyprus has no doubts concerning its sovereign rights over its exclusive economic zone and its continental shelf stemming from the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and customary international law and recognised by the international community.
He may be right to recommend using the Law of the Sea to help split sovereignty from commercial exploitation and joint development of fishing, oil and gas resources.
A statement released by the Russian foreign ministry said Moscow opted out of the UN Law of the Sea dispute resolution process in 1997.
Introduced in the late 1960s by UN member states to prevent conflicts over maritime rights between nations, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (also known as "UNCLOS" or the "Convention") is a treaty designed to govern the navigation, fishing, and exploitation of resources in the world's oceans.
Perhaps the most visible failure in terms of Arctic policy is the failure of the United States Senate to ratify the Law of the Sea Treaty.
But when they were writing the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea in the 1970s, there were no pirates, so they dropped the rule of "universal jurisdiction" in favour of a legal regime more attuned to modern notions of human rights and national sovereignty.
Yes, there is a possibility envisaged in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.
The first step is to establish and "grandfather-in" a legal baseline for their coastlines, in order to properly claim their Exclusive Economic Zone, in accordance with the UN Law of the Sea.
has no chance of representation on the International Tribunal for the law of the Sea, key to deciding jurisdictional issues, especially illegal fishing practices.
Very likely if there had been a Law of the Sea and UN oversight of scientific research, none of that would have happened.
accession to the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea has elicited, as it did when the Senate last considered the Convention in 2004, an amazing array of opposition arguments.