lay sister


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lay sister

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a woman who has taken the vows of a religious order but is not ordained and not bound to divine office
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Despite the explicit wishes of her parents, she resisted becoming a choir nun and instead became a lay sister.
72) Christine Trimingham Jack, 'The Lay Sister in Educational History and Memory', History of Education, vol.
A final grouping is pedagogical: Fritz Peter Knapp offers some comments on language and audience in early religious literature, with interesting speculations on the position of the conversi (a theme encountered elsewhere), while Peter Ochsenbein looks at Latin in everyday use by late mediaeval Dominican nuns (one lay sister reputedly announced post mortem that she could at last understand the texts she had been singing).
Beautiful and of prominent lineage, Mary Ward was destined for marriage but refused it, ultimately persuading her parents to allow her to clandestinely travel to Belgium where she could enter the convent as a lay sister of the Poor Clares.
In the book and multimedia online publication, Sensual Encounters, Erika Lindgren examines how Dominican nuns and lay sisters located in six southern German houses during the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries interpreted their surroundings and incorporated their sensory experiences into their spiritual and devotional lives.
As the laity has sprung to the support of the sisters, the sisters have realized in a new way how intimately connected their life has become to that of their lay sisters and brothers.
As family matriarchs, widows, or lay sisters, they ordered architecture and art objects appropriate to their characters.
I wish that some Catholic magazine would publish articles featuring dedicated lay sisters and brothers and the ministries in which they are evangelizing, educating, and healing people, especially the poor.
Readers of the ILS familiar with the recent expose of the Magdalen laundries are aware of workers' conditions in such institutions, but Hearn's data on the difference between the time spent in the lay Protestant-run facilities, a limited time (usually nine month to two years) before they were placed in service or assisted to emigrate and the Magdalen asylums run by Catholic religious where the workers often stayed for their entire lives living as lower caste lay sisters are telling.
Weaver views the religious community as a "feminine subculture" (3) that united women behind the walls with their lay sisters who lived outside them, even after the post-Tridentine enforced enclosure of all convents.
Mary was a feminine enclave, inhabited solely by women, whether choir nuns, lay Sisters or students, presided over by the Mother Superior.
Although the radical Revolution confiscated the hospitals' endowments and expelled the nuns and lay sisters, the Napoleonic regime reconstituted the former and restored the latter.