Leavis


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Leavis

(ˈliːvɪs)
n
(Biography) F(rank) R(aymond). 1895–1978, English literary critic. He edited Scrutiny (1932–53) and his books include The Great Tradition (1948) and The Common Pursuit (1952)
ˈLeavisˌite adj, n
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the best pieces in the anthology is Simon During's look back at the days "When Literary Criticism Mattered"--that period in the mid-twentieth century when Leavis and the Scrutiny group dominated Britain's literary landscape.
Leavis, especially in The Great Tradition (1948), exercises an important influence.
A PG Phillips B RS Thomas C FR Leavis D TE Howard 11.
E certo que a "nova critica" contribuiu nao apenas para fixar o argumento de Eliot justamente nesse lugar, como tambem para complementa-lo com afirmacoes laconicas cujo valor de verdade parece prescindir de verificacao, dado o seu carater a principio autoevidente: como prologo para um livro que se ocupa da analise das contribuicoes de apenas tres poetas para o mundo moderno, Leavis assinala que "o leitor, sentindo a falta de alguns nomes, poderia reclamar que o criterio de selecao e muito rigoroso.
Leavis in The Great Tradition highly praises Jane Austen, George Eliot, Henry James, Joseph Conrad and D.
discussed by Moretti, the Franco-British comparisons of Queenie Leavis,
The Inklings' rebuttal of Richards and Leavis was based on a clear-sighted view of literature as an endeavor that held inestimable worth in its own right.
The recently-appointed studio manager is Rachel Leavis, from Darlington.
Leavis at Cambridge and working for the British Film Institute, he came home to Canada to found one of the first film programmes in the country at Queen's University in Kingston in 1969.
Equally fascinating and instructive for Paik is his concept of the "third realm," an ontology of literature not veering into extreme subjectivism or objectivism as Chung wrote about Paik's thought on Leavis ("Leavis' Criticism" 89-90).
Leavis, The Great Tradition, Pelican 1972 (1948); I.
This humanistic view was subsequently echoed by Arnold, Leavis, Pound and Read.