Lee


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lee

 (lē)
n.
1. Nautical The side away from the direction from which the wind blows.
2. An area sheltered from the wind: in the lee of the boulder.
3. Cover; shelter.
adj.
1. Nautical Of or relating to the side sheltered from the wind: the lee gunwale.
2. Located in or facing the path of an oncoming glacier. Used of a geologic formation.

[Middle English le, from Old English hlēo, shelter, protection; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

lee

(liː)
n
1. a sheltered part or side; the side away from the direction from which the wind is blowing
2. (Nautical Terms) by the lee nautical so that the wind is blowing on the wrong side of the sail
3. (Nautical Terms) under the lee nautical towards the lee
adj
(Nautical Terms) (prenominal) nautical on, at, or towards the side or part away from the wind: on a lee shore. Compare weather5
[Old English hlēow shelter; related to Old Norse hle]

Lee

(liː)
n
(Placename) a river in SW Republic of Ireland, flowing east into Cork Harbour. Length: about 80 km (50 miles)

Lee

(liː)
n
1. (Biography) Ang (æŋ). born 1954, Taiwanese film director; his films include Sense and Sensibility (1995), Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), Brokeback Mountain (2005), and Life of Pi (2012)
2. (Biography) Bruce, original name Lee Yuen Kam. 1940–73, US film actor and kung fu expert who starred in such films as Enter the Dragon (1973)
3. (Biography) Gypsy Rose, original name Rose Louise Hovick. 1914–70, US striptease and burlesque artiste, who appeared in the Ziegfeld Follies (1936) and in films
4. (Biography) Laurie (ˈlɒrɪ). 1914–97, British poet and writer, best known for the autobiographical Cider with Rosie (1959)
5. (Biography) Richard Henry. 1732–94, American Revolutionary statesman, who moved the resolution in favour of American independence (1776)
6. (Biography) Robert E(dward). 1807–70, American general; commander-in-chief of the Confederate armies in the Civil War
7. (Biography) Spike, real name Shelton Jackson Lee. born 1957, US film director: his films include She's Gotta Have It (1985), Malcolm X (1992), and the documentary When the Leeves Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts (2008)
8. (Biography) T(sung)-D(ao) (tsuːŋ daʊ). born 1926, US physicist, born in China. With Yang he disproved the principle that parity is always conserved and shared the Nobel prize for physics in 1957

lee1

(li)

n.
1. protective shelter: the lee of a rock in a storm.
2. the side or part that is sheltered or turned away from the wind: huts erected under the lee of the mountain.
3. Chiefly Naut. the quarter or region toward which the wind blows.
adj.
4. pertaining to, situated in, or moving toward the lee.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English hlēo(w) shelter, c. Old Frisian hli, hly, Old Saxon hleo, Old Norse hlé]

lee2

(li)

n.
Usu., lees. the insoluble matter that settles from a liquid, esp. from wine; sediment; dregs.
[1350–1400; Middle English lie < Middle French < Medieval Latin lia, probably < Gaulish *lig(j)a; compare Old Irish lige bed]

Lee

(li)

n.
1. Ann, 1736–84, British mystic: founder of Shaker sect in U.S.
2. Charles, 1731–82, American Revolutionary general, born in England.
3. Francis Lightfoot, 1734–97, American Revolutionary statesman.
4. Gypsy Rose (Rose Louise Hovick), 1914–70, U.S. entertainer.
5. Henry ( “Light-Horse Harry” ), 1756–1818, American Revolutionary general (father of Robert E. Lee).
6. Manfred Bennington ("Ellery Queen"), 1905–71, U.S. mystery writer, in collaboration with Frederic Dannay.
7. Richard Henry, 1732–94, American Revolutionary statesman (brother of Francis L. Lee).
8. Robert E(dward), 1807–70, Confederate general in the Civil War (son of Henry Lee).
9. Tsung-Dao (ˈdzʊŋˈdaʊ) born 1926, Chinese physicist: Nobel prize 1957..
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lee - United States filmmaker whose works explore the richness of black culture in America (born in 1957)
2.Lee - United States striptease artist who became famous on Broadway in the 1930s (1914-1970)
3.Lee - United States actor who was an expert in kung fu and starred in martial arts films (1941-1973)
4.Lee - United States physicist (born in China) who collaborated with Yang Chen Ning in disproving the principle of conservation of parity (born in 1926)
5.lee - leader of the American Revolution who proposed the resolution calling for independence of the American Colonies (1732-1794)Lee - leader of the American Revolution who proposed the resolution calling for independence of the American Colonies (1732-1794)
6.lee - soldier of the American Revolution (1756-1818)Lee - soldier of the American Revolution (1756-1818)
7.lee - American general who led the Confederate Armies in the American Civil War (1807-1870)Lee - American general who led the Confederate Armies in the American Civil War (1807-1870)
8.lee - the side of something that is sheltered from the wind
side, face - a surface forming part of the outside of an object; "he examined all sides of the crystal"; "dew dripped from the face of the leaf"
Adj.1.lee - towards the side away from the wind
leeward - on the side away from the wind; "on the leeward side of the island"

lee

noun shelter, cover, screen, protection, shadow, shade, shield, refuge The church nestles in the lee of a hill beneath the town.
Translations
závětří
szélárnyék
skjól, var, hlé
dreifaslaiko atsargaprarastas laikasužuovėja
aizvējšpatvērums
závetrie
rüzgâr altırüzgârdan korunmalı yer

lee

[liː]
A. Nsotavento m; (= shelter) → abrigo m, socaire m
in the lee ofal socaire or abrigo de
B. ADJde sotavento

lee

[ˈliː] ncôté m sous le vent
in the lee of → à l'abri de

lee

adjLee-; lee sideLeeseite f
n
(Naut) → Lee f
(= shelter)Schutz m, → Windschatten m

lee

[liː]
1. nlato m sottovento inv
in the lee of → a ridosso di, al riparo di
2. adjsottovento inv
to have a lee helm (ship) → essere poggiero/a

lee

(liː) noun
the sheltered side, away from the wind. We sat in the lee of the rock.
ˈleeway noun
1. the drifting of a ship etc away from its true course, or the amount of this.
2. lost time. He has a lot of leeway to make up at school after being away ill.
3. extra space, time etc allowed. Book the later flight so as to allow yourself some leeway in case you're delayed.
References in classic literature ?
Having taken the pirate captain prisoner, sailed slap over the schooner, whose decks were piled high with dead and whose lee scuppers ran blood, for the order had been `Cutlasses, and die hard
Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land; loitering under the shady lee of yonder warehouses will not suffice.
True, other fish are found exceedingly brisk in those Hyperborean waters; but these, be it observed, are your cold-blooded, lungless fish, whose very bellies are refrigerators; creatures, that warm themselves under the lee of an iceberg, as a traveller in winter would bask before an inn fire; whereas, like man, the whale has lungs and warm blood.
Did the thing, I am still wondering; Set up how or when, By what selectmen, Gourgas or Lee, Clark or Darby?
Bessie Lee must, I think, have been a girl of good natural capacity, for she was smart in all she did, and had a remarkable knack of narrative; so, at least, I judge from the impression made on me by her nursery tales.
We stopped under the lee of the lobster-outhouse to exchange an innocent kiss, and went in to breakfast glowing with health and pleasure.
We were noticing this, and saying how that the mist rose with a change of wind from a certain quarter of our marshes, when we came upon a man, slouching under the lee of the turnpike house.
It's been meat and drink, and man and wife, to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on again for a while with curses.
Then, says the old ballad, Robin Hood set his horn to mouth and blew mighty blasts; and half a hundred yeomen, bows bent, came raking over the lee.
At last came the day that the steamer dropped anchor in the lee of a wooded promontory where a score or more of sheet- iron shacks making an unsightly blot upon the fair face of nature proclaimed the fact that civilization had set its heel.
The names of Candlish and Begg were frequent in these interviews, and occasionally the talk ran on the Residuary Establishment and the doings of one Lee.
One of these worthies--a tall, lank figure, brandishing a rusty sword of immense longitude--purported to be no less a personage than General George Washington; and the other principal officers of the American army, such as Gates, Lee, Putnam, Schuyler, Ward and Heath, were represented by similar scarecrows.