legion

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Related to Legions: Roman legions

le·gion

 (lē′jən)
n.
1. The major unit of the Roman army consisting of 3,000 to 6,000 infantry troops and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
2. A large military unit trained for combat; an army.
3. A large number; a multitude. See Synonyms at multitude.
4. often Legion A national organization of former members of the armed forces.
adj.
Constituting a large number; multitudinous: Her admirers were legion. His mistakes were legion.

[Middle English legioun, from Old French legion, from Latin legiō, legiōn-, from legere, to gather; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

legion

(ˈliːdʒən)
n
1. (Military) a military unit of the ancient Roman army made up of infantry with supporting cavalry, numbering some three to six thousand men
2. (Military) any large military force: the French Foreign Legion.
3. (Military) (usually capital) an association of ex-servicemen: the British Legion.
4. (often plural) any very large number, esp of people
adj
(usually postpositive) very large or numerous
[C13: from Old French, from Latin legio, from legere to choose]

le•gion

(ˈli dʒən)

n.
1. the largest unit of the Roman army, comprising at different periods from about 3000 to 6000 foot soldiers, with a much smaller complement of cavalry.
2. a military or semimilitary unit.
3. the Legion.
4. any large group of armed men.
5. any great number of persons or things; multitude; throng.
adj.
6. very great in number: The holy man's followers were legion.
[1175–1225; Middle English legi(o)un (< Old French) < Latin legiō=leg(ere) to gather, choose, read + -iō -ion]

Legion

 a multitude; a great number; a unit of Roman troops; a host of armed men.
Examples: legion of angels, 1380; of appetites and passions, 1751; of devils; of horrid hell, 1605; of knights, 1400; of reproaches, 1634; of Rome, 1387; of troops; of whelps, 1824.

legion

A Roman military unit, originally a citizen army, later comprising 4000 to 6000 heavy infantry soldiers with cavalry support.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legion - archaic terms for armylegion - archaic terms for army    
Roman Legion - a division of from 3000 to 6000 men (including cavalry) in the Roman army
Sabaoth - (plural) hosts or armies; used in the book of Romans in the New Testament; "Lord of Sabaoth"
army, ground forces, regular army - a permanent organization of the military land forces of a nation or state
2.legion - association of ex-servicemen; "the American Legion"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
3.legion - a large military unit; "the French Foreign Legion"
military force, military group, military unit, force - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
foreign legion - a military unit composed of foreign volunteers who serve the state
legionary, legionnaire - a soldier who is a member of a legion (especially the French Foreign Legion)
4.legion - a vast multitude
concourse, throng, multitude - a large gathering of people
Adj.1.legion - amounting to a large indefinite number; "numerous times"; "the family was numerous"; "Palomar's fans are legion"
many - a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `as' or `too' or `so' or `that'; amounting to a large but indefinite number; "many temptations"; "the temptations are many"; "a good many"; "a great many"; "many directions"; "take as many apples as you like"; "too many clouds to see"; "never saw so many people"

legion

noun
1. army, company, force, division, troop, brigade The last of the Roman legions left Britain in AD 410.
2. multitude, host, mass, drove, number, horde, myriad, throng His sense of humour won him a legion of friends.
adjective
1. very many, numerous, countless, myriad, numberless, multitudinous Books on this subject are legion.

legion

noun
A very large number of things grouped together:
adjective
Amounting to or consisting of a large, indefinite number:
Idiom: quite a few.
Translations
عَدَد غَفيرفَيْلَق
legiezástup
hærskarelegionmængde
légiósokaság
fjöldi, aragrúihersveit
legionas
leģionsmilzums
légia
alayçok kalabalık sayıdalejyon

legion

[ˈliːdʒən] Nlegión f (also fig)
they are legionson legión, son muchos
LEGION
La American Legion es una organización de veteranos de las Fuerzas Armadas estadounidenses. Se fundó después de la Primera Guerra Mundial y se encarga del cuidado y la reintegración de los veteranos de guerra y sus familias. También es un órgano de presión ante el Congreso en favor de los intereses de los veteranos y de un sólido sistema de defensa nacional. A otro nivel, la American Legion ha creado clubs sociales para sus miembros.
En el Reino Unido el equivalente de la American Legion es la British Legion que, todos los años en noviembre, recauda fondos mediante la venta de amapolas de papel.

legion

[ˈliːdʒən]
n
(= group of soldiers) → légion f
(fig) (= large number) [fans, supporters] → légion f
adj (= very numerous) to be legion → être légion inv
Stories about him are legion → Les récits à son sujet sont légion.

legion

n
Armee f; (= Foreign Legion)Legion f
(Roman) → Legion f
(= organization) LegionLegion f; American/British LegionAmerican/British Legion f (Verband der Kriegsveteranen); Legion of HonourEhrenlegion f
(fig: = large number) → Legion f; they are legionihre Zahl ist Legion; his supporters are legionseine Anhänger sind Legion

legion

[ˈliːdʒn]
1. nlegione f (fig) → schiera, stuolo
2. adj (frm) (very many) → innumerevole

legion

(ˈliːdʒən) noun
1. in ancient Rome, a body of from three to six thousand soldiers.
2. a great many or a very large number.
References in classic literature ?
Mucianus undid Vitellius, by a fame that he scattered, that Vitellius had in purpose to remove the legions of Syria into Germany, and the legions of Germany into Syria; whereupon the legions of Syria were infinitely inflamed.
They came and went in legions that darkened all the shore.
So spake the Sovran voice, and Clouds began To darken all the Hill, and smoak to rowl In duskie wreathes, reluctant flames, the signe Of wrauth awak't: nor with less dread the loud Ethereal Trumpet from on high gan blow: At which command the Powers Militant, That stood for Heav'n, in mighty Quadrate joyn'd Of Union irresistible, mov'd on In silence thir bright Legions, to the sound Of instrumental Harmonie that breath'd Heroic Ardor to advent'rous deeds Under thir God-like Leaders, in the Cause Of God and his MESSIAH.
The legions fall on one another In the last surge of life and death.
We have seen what legions of admirers and friends Barbicane's project had rallied round its author.
Those legions of strangers, hurrying from all parts of the globe toward the American shores, would they leave the Union without having seen Barbicane, Nicholl, and Michel Ardan?
He seemed to hear again around him the legions of whirring wings to which he had been so lately accustomed.
It was composed of numberless legions of that species of grasshopper called crickets.
The Emperors exchanged decorations: Alexander received the Cross of the Legion of Honor and Napoleon the Order of St.
He was dressed in a blue frock-coat, buttoned up to the chin, and wore at his button-hole the rosette of an officer of the Legion of Honor.
Such was the din of the bells and the squalling of the cats, that though the duke and duchess were the contrivers of the joke they were startled by it, while Don Quixote stood paralysed with fear; and as luck would have it, two or three of the cats made their way in through the grating of his chamber, and flying from one side to the other, made it seem as if there was a legion of devils at large in it.
All had helms on their heads, and lances and shields in their hands; they increased in numbers; and when Gerda had finished the Lord's Prayer, she was surrounded by a whole legion.