legitimate theater

(redirected from Legitimate stage)

legitimate theater

Professional, high-quality theater, as opposed to vaudeville or burlesque.
References in classic literature ?
Not content with doubling the legitimate stages, they switched off the main road and went away out of the way to visit an absurd fountain called Figia, because Baalam's ass had drank there once.
The Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises is the holder of worldwide motion picture, legitimate stage, merchandising, and other rights in the literary works of J.
Keep the legitimate stage alive in your town," she said.
While the veteran of the legitimate stage may smile complacently, the celluloid star must learn the art of make-up all over again.
Dating from William Butler Yeats, Edward Martyn, George Moore, and Lady Augusta Gregory's founding of the Irish Literary Theatre in 1899 (which would become the Abbey, Ireland's national theatre), the critical cachet of the playwright and the literary power of the legitimate stage have had remarkable staying power in Ireland, and remain in most cases the go-to method for organizing surveys of the Irish theatre.
Ruscio also appeared regularly on the Los Angeles legitimate stage.
The pursuit of this theme thus confirms and elaborates a priority of Jacky Bratton's more theoretical prescriptions for a new theatre history in her concept of 'intertheatricality, (2) the skein of multiple associations that energised the popular scene and merits scholarly unpacking as much as the higher literature of the legitimate stage.
My father loved theater people and they loved him back, not actors of the legitimate stage particularly, who tended to be lofty and remote and assimilated, but the vaudeville types and radio stars, also prize fighters and ball players.
But our communities will remain divided while people like Brooks are given a legitimate stage to spew their pernicious views.
Five seasons on Nick -- and one ``SpongeBob'' film later, Fagerbakke has returned to the legitimate stage for the first time in nearly two decades.
This scene voices a typical complaint that the legitimate stage "failed to show proper respect" for Shakespeare.