lekythos


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Related to lekythos: Oinochoe, Pelike, amphora

lek·y·thos

 (lĕk′ə-thŏs′)
n. pl. lek·y·thoi (-thoi′)
A slender, narrow-necked, one-handled flask, used in ancient Greece for holding oil, especially oil used in anointing the dead.

[Greek lēkuthos.]

lekythos

(ˈliːkɪˌθɒs)
n
(Historical Terms) Greek history a flask with a narrow neck, used in ancient times as a container for ointments and oils
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, A Thousand Tiny Deaths dangled vessels not of one uniform shape but rather of diverse types with connections to specific cultures and historical periods: the meiping vase, the ambrosia vase, the squat lekythos and so forth.
18) On a lekythos by the Oinokles Painter, dated c.
17) Among them were the Baring Amphora from the Dipylon Painter's workshop; a pair of delicate gilded kantharoi; an impeccable amphora attributed to the Group of the Floral Nolans (all now at San Simeon); and a black-figured lekythos with Hercules, Mercury and Neptune fishing (once in the Hope collection), now in the Metropolitan.
For example, grapes and nautical images might be used on the kylix (drinking cup) or a ceremonial procession might be a part of the lekythos (oil flask) design.
There is also a large South Italian lekythos (a container for perfumed oil) from about 350-340 B.
Tonight, odor of skunk hanging like a philosopher's soul in the air, I sit beneath a xerox copy of a photograph - one of those Greek vases called a lekythos, this one showing a daughter of Memory,
Some particularly good examples of this type are the late Archaic red-figure cup, Munich, Museum antiker Kleinkunst, 2679, ARV2 231/85, from Cerveteri; A late Archaic red-figure pelike by Myson, Paris, Louvre, C 11100, ARV2 238/9; A late Archaic red-figure pelike by the Syleus Painter, Leningrad, Museum of the Hermitage, 1591, ARV2 250/17; An early Classical red-figure lekythos by the Bowdoin Painter, Cracow, Czartoryski Museum, 605, ARV2 682/113 from Attica; Early Classical red-figure cup, Berkeley, University of California, 83225, ARV2 822/24, from Etruria.