Levite

(redirected from Levitical Priesthood)
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Le·vite

 (lē′vīt′)
n. Bible
A member of the lineage of Jews who were of the tribe of Levi but not descended from Aaron, and whose men historically served as assistants to the Temple priests.

[Middle English, from Late Latin Lēvītēs, Lēvīta, from Greek Leuītēs, from Leui, Levi, from Hebrew Lēwî.]

Levite

(ˈliːvaɪt)
n
1. (Bible) Old Testament a member of the priestly tribe of Levi
2. (Judaism) Judaism another word for Levi3

Le•vite

(ˈli vaɪt)

n.
1. a member of the tribe of Levi, esp. one appointed to assist the Temple priests.
2. a descendant of the tribe of Levi, having honorific religious duties.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Late Latin Levīta < Greek Leuitēs Levite <Leui (< Hebrew Lēvī Levi, Levite)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Levite - a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi (especially the branch that provided male assistants to the temple priests)Levite - a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi (especially the branch that provided male assistants to the temple priests)
Jew, Hebrew, Israelite - a person belonging to the worldwide group claiming descent from Jacob (or converted to it) and connected by cultural or religious ties
Translations

Levite

[ˈliːvaɪt] Nlevita m

Levite

nLevit(e) m
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that he is the first priest of the God whom the descendants of Abraham serve and that due to him we are able to talk about a legitimate priesthood before the Levitical priesthood (Grypeou and Spurling 2013, 200; McNamara, 2000, 1-31), determines us to pay more attention to the biblical texts and to the manner in which they were perceived by the two religions of the Scripture to observe the role that Melchizedek has within their history.
This view fails to realize that, even prior to the establishment of the Levitical priesthood, there was already a separate group of priests who served Israel (cf.
Its common themes include the preference for the solar calendar, an emphasis on levitical priesthood traced back to some of the righteous ancestors, and the extension of temple purity to everyday life.