Lexington


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Lex·ing·ton

 (lĕk′sĭng-tən)
1. A city of north-central Kentucky east of Louisville. A noted center for the raising of thoroughbred horses, it was named in 1775 after the Battle of Lexington.
2. A town of northeast Massachusetts, a residential suburb of Boston. The Battle of Lexington (April 19, 1775) marked the beginning of the American Revolution.

Lexington

(ˈlɛksɪŋtən)
n
1. (Placename) a city in NE central Kentucky, in the bluegrass region: major centre for horse-breeding. Pop (including Fayette): 266 798 (2003 est)
2. (Placename) a city in Massachusetts, northwest of Boston: site of the first action (1775) of the War of American Independence. Pop: 30 631 (2003 est)

Lex•ing•ton

(ˈlɛk sɪŋ tən)

n.
1. a town in E Massachusetts, NW of Boston: first battle of the American Revolution fought here April 19, 1775. 29,479.
2. a city in N Kentucky. 239,942.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lexington - town in eastern Massachusetts near Boston where the first battle of the American Revolution was foughtLexington - town in eastern Massachusetts near Boston where the first battle of the American Revolution was fought
Bay State, Massachusetts, Old Colony, MA - a state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies
2.Lexington - a city in eastern Kentucky; noted for raising thoroughbred horses
Bluegrass State, Kentucky, KY - a state in east central United States; a border state during the American Civil War; famous for breeding race horses
3.Lexington - the first battle of the American Revolution (April 19, 1775)
American Revolution, American Revolutionary War, American War of Independence, War of American Independence - the revolution of the American Colonies against Great Britain; 1775-1783
Bay State, Massachusetts, Old Colony, MA - a state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies
References in classic literature ?
Yes," replied Grandfather; "it was so called, because the British, without provocation, had fired upon a party of minute-men, near Lexington meeting-house, and killed eight of them.
In a field, near Lexington, an Indian shot a man, and running to scalp him, was himself shot from the fort, and fell dead upon his enemy.
These led them to execute every diabolical scheme; and, on the fifteenth day of August, commanded a party of Indians and Canadians, of about five hundred in number, against Briant's station, five miles from Lexington.
Five years later, in the twilight of an April morning, he stood on the green, beside the meeting-house, at Lexington, where now the obelisk of granite, with a slab of slate inlaid, commemorates the first fallen of the Revolutions.
Archer connected it in his mind with a little house beyond Lexington Avenue in which beribboned window curtains and flower-boxes had recently appeared, and before whose newly painted door the canary-coloured brougham of Miss Fanny Ring was frequently seen to wait.
One day a man came to my hut from Lexington to inquire after his hound that made a large track, and had been hunting for a week by himself.
Lexington is her name--a little, dark, silent person, with suspicious and sidelong eyes.
Lexington, who drew the night constable's attention to it.
That drop was falling when the Pyramids were new; when Troy fell; when the foundations of Rome were laid when Christ was crucified; when the Conqueror created the British empire; when Columbus sailed; when the massacre at Lexington was "news.
In this same year Henry Clay delivered his memorable speech on the Mexican War, at Lexington, Kentucky, and it was telegraphed to The New York Herald at a cost of five hundred dollars, thus breaking all previous records for news-gathering enterprise.
So Jurgis became one of the new "American heroes," a man whose virtues merited comparison with those of the martyrs of Lexington and Valley Forge.
Fleets and armies, the blood of Lexington, and the fires of Charlestown and Falmouth, had been the answer to petition, remonstrance, and address.

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