Leyden jar

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Leyden jar

n.
An early form of capacitor consisting of a glass jar lined inside and out with tinfoil and having a conducting rod connected to the inner foil lining and passing out of the jar through an insulated stopper.

[After Leyden (Leiden).]

Leyden jar

n
(Electrical Engineering) physics an early type of capacitor consisting of a glass jar with the lower part of the inside and outside coated with tin foil
[C18: first made in Leiden]

Ley′den jar`


n.
a device for storing electric charge, consisting essentially of a metal rod in a glass jar lined inside and outside with tinfoil.
[1815–25; so called because invented in Leyden]

Ley·den jar

(līd′n)
An early device for storing electric charge. It consists of a glass jar with conductive metal foil covering most of the inner and outer surfaces (all except the top parts). A metal rod or wire, used to draw electric charge into the jar, touches the inner foil and then exits through an insulating stopper in the neck.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Leyden jar - an electrostatic capacitor of historical interestLeyden jar - an electrostatic capacitor of historical interest
capacitor, condenser, electrical condenser, capacitance - an electrical device characterized by its capacity to store an electric charge
Translations

Leyden jar

nLeidener Flasche f
References in classic literature ?
Mazarin bounded in his bed as if he had been put in relation with a Leyden jar or a voltaic pile, at the same time that a surprise, or rather a manifest disappointment, inflamed his features with such a blaze of anger, that Louis XIV.
Those early, simple spark gap transmitters have an ancestry that can be traced back to the electrical machines and Leyden jars that 18th-century experimenters used to astound their spectators.
Lightning Rod and Franklin's Static Electricity Tube, Box of Leyden Jars (demonstrating the first "battery", built and named by Franklin), Franklin's Electrostatic Generator and Thornton Oakley's "Mural of Franklin's Lightning".