Liechtenstein


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Liechtenstein

Liech·ten·stein

 (lĭk′tən-stīn′, lĭKH′tən-shtīn′)
A small Alpine principality in central Europe between Austria and Switzerland. It was created as a principality within the Holy Roman Empire in 1719 and became independent in 1866. Vaduz is the capital.

Liech′ten·stein′er n.

Liechtenstein

(ˈlɪktənˌstaɪn; German ˈlɪçtənʃtain)
n
(Placename) a small mountainous principality in central Europe on the Rhine: formed in 1719 by the uniting of the lordships of Schellenburg and Vaduz, which had been purchased by the Austrian family of Liechtenstein; customs union formed with Switzerland in 1924. Official language: German. Religion: Roman Catholic majority. Currency: Swiss franc. Capital: Vaduz. Pop: 37 009 (2003 est). Area: 160 sq km (62 sq miles)

Liech•ten•stein

(ˈlɪk tənˌstaɪn, ˈlɪx-)

n.
a small principality in central Europe between Austria and Switzerland. 32,057; 65 sq. mi. (168 sq. km). Cap.: Vaduz.
Liech′ten•stein`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Liechtenstein - a small landlocked principality (constitutional monarchy) in central Europe located in the Alps between Austria and SwitzerlandLiechtenstein - a small landlocked principality (constitutional monarchy) in central Europe located in the Alps between Austria and Switzerland
capital of Liechtenstein, Vaduz - the capital and largest city of Liechtenstein
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Liechtensteiner - a native or inhabitant of Liechtenstein
Translations
Lichtenštejnsko
LichtensteinLiechtenstein
Liechtenstein
Lihtenštajn
Liechtenstein
リヒテンシュタイン
리히텐슈타인
Lichtenstein
Liechtenstein
ประเทศลิคเตนสไตน์
nước Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein

[ˈlɪktənstaɪn] NLiechtenstein m

Liechtenstein

[ˈlɪktənstaɪn] nLiechtenstein mlie detector ndétecteur m de mensongeslie-down [ˌlaɪˈdaʊn] n (British) to have a lie-down → s'allonger, se reposerlie-in [ˌlaɪˈɪn] n (British) to have a lie-in → faire la grasse matinée
I have a lie-in on Sundays → Je fais la grasse matinée le dimanche.

Liechtenstein

nLiechtenstein nt

Liechtenstein

[ˈlɪktənˌstaɪn] nLiechtenstein m

Liechtenstein

لـِخْتَنشْتَايْن‏ Lichtenštejnsko Lichtenstein Liechtenstein Λιχτενστάιν Liechtenstein Liechtenstein Liechtenstein Lihtenštajn Liechtenstein リヒテンシュタイン 리히텐슈타인 Liechtenstein Liechtenstein Liechtenstein Liechtenstein, Principado de Liechtenstein Лихтенштейн Liechtenstein ประเทศลิคเตนสไตน์ Lihtenştayn nước Liechtenstein 列支敦士登
References in periodicals archive ?
A courtesy call was made on Hereditary Prince Alois von Liechtenstein for informal talks on common goals and key global issues between the two countries.
But a return of six points after wins in Switzerland and Liechtenstein has left them handily placed in Group Eight.
Maymay' Liechtenstein is known in lifestyle circles for dinners that are multi-sensorial experiences.
Liechtenstein is a tiny principality squeezed between Switzerland and Austria.
In recent years Liechtenstein banking secrecy has been softened to allow for greater cooperation with other countries to identify tax evasion.
The United States provides no development assistance to Liechtenstein.
The Liechtenstein insurance industry's growth prospects by segment and category
Prospects of inter-parliamentary cooperation and bilateral relations between Kazakhstan and Liechtenstein were discussed.
All my thoughts are about football and the match with Liechtenstein.
His Royal Highness also touched on relations between Bahrain and Liechtenstein, welcoming the LGT Group's presence in Bahrain, and discussed ways Bahrain can help the LGT Group expand operations within the region.
Liechtenstein surely won't win - they've beaten only Andorra in the past two years - but they are improving.
This volume is the product of the 2005 Liechtenstein Colloquium on European and International Affairs, which was dedicated to honoring the work of Princeton University's emeritus professor of public and international affairs, Robert Gilpin, "one of the most influential realist scholars in US and international academia," in the words of editor Danspeckgruber (founding director, Liechtenstein Institute on Self Determination, Princeton U.