lipase

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Related to Lipases: Phospholipases

lip·ase

 (lĭp′ās′, lī′pās′)
n.
Any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of fats into glycerol and fatty acids.

lipase

(ˈlaɪpeɪs; ˈlɪpeɪs)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of fat-digesting enzymes produced in the stomach, pancreas, and liver and also occurring widely in the seeds of plants
[C19: from Greek lipos fat + -ase]

li•pase

(ˈlaɪ peɪs, ˈlɪp eɪs)

n.
any of a class of enzymes that break down fats, produced by the liver, pancreas, and other digestive organs or by certain plants.
[1895–1900; < Greek líp(os) fat + -ase]

lip·ase

(lĭp′ās′, lī′pās′)
An enzyme that promotes the decomposition of fats to form glycerol and fatty acids.

lipase

An enzyme that digests fat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lipase - an enzyme secreted in the digestive tract that catalyzes the breakdown of fats into individual fatty acids that can be absorbed into the bloodstream
gastric acid, gastric juice - digestive secretions of the stomach glands consisting chiefly of hydrochloric acid and mucin and the enzymes pepsin and rennin and lipase
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
Translations
lipase

li·pase

n. lipasa, enzima segregada por el páncreas que cataliza las grasas y lipoproteínas usualmente en degradación de glicerol y ácido lípido.

lipase

n lipasa
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of hydrolytic activity for the free and immobilized lipases, in terms of reaction time, are found in Figure 2.
This trend suggests the presence of two reaction mechanisms (hydrolyses and esterification), both linked to lipases (Liu & Chang, 2008, Liu et al.
Plant lipases from latex properties and industrial application.
Lipases em biocatalise in Bonetal Enzimas em biotechologia Producao Aplicacaoe Mercado Riode Janeiro Interciencia.
Lipases are renowned for their versatility in addition to their ability to digest fat.
Lipases are ubiquitous enzymes widely present in many species of animals, plants, bacteria, yeast and fungi (Dong et al.
The authors have organized the main body of their text in six chapters devoted to the fundamentals of enzymes, lipases, lipase immobilization, the kinetics of soluble and immobilized enzymes, and a variety of other related subjects.
Lipases are hydrolytic enzymes involved in the breakdown of triglycerides to glycerol and free fatty acids.
Microorganisms with a potential for lipases production may be found in different habitats, including waste vegetable oils, dairy products, oil contaminated environment, seeds and spoiled food (SHARMA et al.
Lipases are well known among the extensively used biocatalysts because they have the ability to catalyze several remarkable reactions in aqueous and non-aqueous media like esterification and transesterification.
Similarly, it has been reported that, lipase production by Bacillus coagulans was found maximum at 40[degrees]C that decrease with increasing temperature (34); while, esterase production by Lactobacillus brevis NJ13 was found highest at 50[degrees]C (35).