lipogrammatic


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lipogrammatic

(ˌlɪpəʊɡrəˈmætɪk; ˌlaɪpəʊɡrəˈmætɪk)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of or relating to a lipogram
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) not containing a particular letter of the alphabet
References in periodicals archive ?
I heard about this work by Carmelo Bene, an Italian poet, theater director, critic, and theater writer, who did a lipogrammatic work on Romeo and Juliet," Manoauch recalled, citing an Oulipian constraint-based practice of omission.
Syntactical play featured heavily in Oulipian work, an example of this is to be found in Georges Perec's 1969 lipogrammatic novel La Disparation (A Void), famously written without the letter "e", a challenge at which even Johnson may have baulked.
Some time in 1936 or 1937, a little-known author and public speaker by the name of Ernest Vincent Wright sat down at his typewriter, tied down its "e" type bar, and banged out Gadsby, a 50 000-word lipogrammatic novel [3].
The book was written three years after its complement, La Disparition, Perec's lengthy lipogrammatic novel in "e" on the disappearance of, among other things, a protagonist named "Voyl" and the letter "e" from the alphabet.
But in a wider sense, all of this ostensibly minor, even insignificant, literature of the infra-ordinary can be assimilated without strain to his fiction--the indefatigable inventory-taking of the world's population of things in Things and Life A User's Manual, the catalogue raisonnee of (fraudulent) paintings in A Gallery Portrait, and even, if of course by default, the lipogrammatic tour de force of A Void.
The Oulipo has developed some variations on the basic lipogram, including lipogrammatic translations, progressive lipograms that eliminate the letters of the alphabet one by one, "beaux presents" and "belles absentes," (31) the prisoner's constraint (where the writer is restricted to letters that do not extend above or below the line), and monovocalic texts, such as Perec's "What a Man.
This lipogrammatic novel, published in 1969, is a 300-page masterwork of linguistic ingenuity, for the letter e, by far the most common letter in French, (1) is used in many of the most common French words (such as le (the), et (and), je (I), and etre (to be)).
33) For Lasos, the purpose of asigmatic composition was not the pursuit of an academic ideal of euphony or of lipogrammatic virtuosity.
If the reviewer may be allowed a cavil, it is this: that worn type has been used for this otherwise handsome 450-pp volume--a damaged lower-case "E" so frequently reading as a "C" that it might be thought to be a quixotic lipogrammatic quest in the wake of Georges Perec.
I've been really enjoying it, particularly Tristan Miller's comprehensive Lipogrammatic Windows Survey and Jim Puder's palindromized color names--a project I can particularly relate to.
lipogrammatic translations, such as the versions "without e" of Mallarme, Baudelaire, etc.
An echo of the novel's central content (or absence) can be seen in the formal constraint adopted by Perec: the lipogrammatic omission of the fifth letter of the alphabet throughout the novel (not to mention the omission of a fifth chapter).