liquidity ratio


Also found in: Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to liquidity ratio: Activity Ratio, Solvency Ratios

liquidity ratio

n
1. (Banking & Finance) Also called: liquid assets ratio the ratio of those assets that can easily be exchanged for money to the total assets of a bank or other financial institution
2. (Commerce) the ratio of a company's liquid assets to its current liabilities, used as a measure of its solvency
3. (Commerce) another name for cash ratio
Translations

liquidity ratio

n (Fin) → rapporto di liquidità
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The regulator is introducing the second of the two Basel III liquidity ratios, namely, structural liquidity ratio (also known as the net stable funding ratio, NSFR).
The BCT explained the positive development of retail deposits by the entry into force of a new liquidity ratio (November 2014), which "makes it possible to overcome the deficiencies of the old ratio .
The third analyzed indicator is current liquidity ratio (see table 3).
Views still clash on liquidity ratios, essentially on the long-term liquidity ratio (NSFR - net stable funding ratio).
The new Basel Accord has stricter requirement for liquidity ratio, in the hope that financial institutions have sufficient liquidity to cope with emergent market situation, thereby boosting the stability of the financial system.
The central bank of Taiwan has announced that it is planning to increase the minimum liquidity ratio for banks.
Brazil's official reserve position remains formidable relative to these flows, evidenced in a 2007 external liquidity ratio of 158.
At the October 3 talks, attended by Internal Market Commissioner Michel Barnier, parties had to agree on two liquidity standards; the short-term liquidity ratio (LCR - liquidity coverage ratio), which will apply in 2015, and the long-term liquidity ratio (NSFR - net stable funding ratio), which should apply from 2018 onwards.
Taiwan's central bank has said that it will raise the minimum liquidity ratio for banks and other lending institutions to 10 percent starting October 1, from seven percent currently, as part of efforts to strengthen their risk management.
The country's liquidity ratio has increased to 157% in 2006 from 47% in 2004.
Official reserve accumulation, combined with the reduction of debt service, has boosted Peru's external liquidity ratio to 207% this year.
International reserve growth and reduced amortizations increased the country's liquidity ratio to 159% at the beginning of 2006 from 102% in 2004.