litigant

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lit·i·gant

 (lĭt′ĭ-gənt)
n.
A party engaged in a lawsuit.
adj.
Engaged in a lawsuit.

[French, from Old French, from Latin lītigāns, lītigant-, a disputant, from present participle of lītigāre, to bring suit; see litigate.]

litigant

(ˈlɪtɪɡənt)
n
(Law) a party to a lawsuit
adj
(Law) engaged in litigation

lit•i•gant

(ˈlɪt ɪ gənt)

n.
1. a person engaged in a lawsuit.
adj.
2. litigating; engaged in a lawsuit.
[1630–40; < Latin]

litigant

A person who is taking part in a lawsuit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.litigant - (law) a party to a lawsuit; someone involved in litigation; "plaintiffs and defendants are both litigants"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
defendant, suspect - a person or institution against whom an action is brought in a court of law; the person being sued or accused
appellant, plaintiff in error - the party who appeals a decision of a lower court
filer - a party who files a notice with a law court
party - a person involved in legal proceedings; "the party of the first part"
complainant, plaintiff - a person who brings an action in a court of law
prevailing party - the party in a lawsuit who obtains a judgment in their own favor

litigant

noun claimant, party, plaintiff, contestant, litigator, disputant The litigant should first write to the defendant.
Translations

litigant

[ˈlɪtɪgənt] Nlitigante mf

litigant

nprozessführende Partei; the litigantsdie Prozessgegner pl, → die prozessführenden Parteien

litigant

[ˈlɪtɪgənt] nlitigante m/f
References in classic literature ?
The chances were that May, who knew nothing of his professional life, and had never shown any interest in it, would not learn of the postponement, should it take place, nor remember the names of the litigants if they were mentioned before her; and at any rate he could no longer put off seeing Madame Olenska.
Around four of the pillars, stalls of merchants, all sparkling with glass and tinsel; around the last three, benches of oak, worn and polished by the trunk hose of the litigants, and the robes of the attorneys.
A JUDGE who had for years looked in vain for an opportunity for infamous distinction, but whom no litigant thought worth bribing, sat one day upon the Bench, lamenting his hard lot, and threatening to put an end to his life if business did not improve.
method by which a litigant without money for lawyers is considerately
Would you say `most,' I replied, when you consider that there is a further stage of the evil in which a man is not only a life-long litigant, passing all his days in the courts, either as plaintiff or defendant, but is actually led by his bad taste to pride himself on his litigiousness; he imagines that he is a master in dishonesty; able to take every crooked turn, and wriggle into and out of every hole, bending like a withy and getting out of the way of justice: and all for what?
He urged judges and lawyers to share common goal of providing speedy and quality justice to the litigants.
ISLAMABAD -- Judge, Supreme Court of Pakistan, Justice Qazi Faez Isa Saturday called for taking due care of the litigants as district judiciary judges are trained and appointed to provide inexpensive and expeditious justice to people.
Several litigants had to go back without their issues being addressed due to the strike announced by lawyers of the district court.
Addressing a joint-press conference held at the office of Punjab Bar Council here on Saturday, the representatives of both the regulatory bodies of the legal fraternity observed that strike calls were causing serious problems in dispensation of justice and depriving the litigants of timely justice.
The Dubai Courts seeks through the initiative to help the litigants who can not afford fees of experts for the cases they file with the court.
In addition to information like house numbers, names of neighborhoods, streets and landmarks, the court officials are provided with details of where the litigants are in the form of sketches created by others involved in the legal matter.
This has made the divorce process, or cases relating to access to children, extremely expensive and many litigants are now being forced to represent themselves, which is putting the court system under greater pressure due to the extra time personal litigants need to put their cases.