LTV

(redirected from Loan-to-value ratio)
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LTV

abbreviation for
(Banking & Finance) loan-to-value
References in periodicals archive ?
Lenders know, for example, that the probability of default, as well as the extent of the loss resulting from default, is strongly related to the loan-to-value ratio of the mortgage: The higher the ratio, the greater the likelihood of default and the larger the potential loss.
If my property hasn't appreciated since the last time it was financed, current loan-to-value ratios are going to prevent any lender from lending me the full amount of the last mortgage," said Richard Pergolis, also a principal in Pergolis Swartz Associates.
The average outstanding principal balance of the loans is $193,754, the weighted average combined original loan-to-value ratio is 76.
Examples of reasons for exclusion from Residential Funding's other programs include, but are not limited to, higher debt-to-income ratios or higher loan-to-value ratios.
Mortgage loans underwritten pursuant to the Expanded Underwriting Guidelines may have higher loan-to-value ratios, higher loan amounts, higher debt-to-income ratios and different documentation requirements than those associated with the Standard Underwriting Guidelines.
For HUD loans, according to Davis, the loan-to-value ratio is 90 percent for new construction and typically 85 percent for refinancing.
Although the HMDA date included information on applicant income, no information was collected on applicants' credit histories, loan-to-value ratios, debt-to-income or so called obligation ratios, and other factors that lenders commonly consider when they make mortgage loan decisions.
7% of the mortgage loans were originated under other programs of Residential Funding that permit mortgage loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 95%.