bleeding

(redirected from Loss of blood)
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Related to Loss of blood: hypervolemia

bleed·ing

 (blē′dĭng)
adj. & adv. Chiefly British Slang
Used as an intensive.

bleeding

(ˈbliːdɪŋ)
adj, adv
(intensifier): a bleeding fool; it's bleeding beautiful.

bleed•ing

(ˈbli dɪŋ)
adv.
Brit. Slang. (used as an intensifier): a bleeding silly idea.
[1175–1225]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bleeding - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vesselbleeding - the flow of blood from a ruptured blood vessel
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
haemorrhagic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke - stroke caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain
cerebral hemorrhage - bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel in the brain
blood extravasation - the leakage of blood from a vessel into tissues surrounding it; can occur in injuries or burns or allergic reactions
hyphema - bleeding into the interior chamber of the eye
metrorrhagia - bleeding from the uterus that is not due to menstruation; usually indicative of disease (as cervical cancer)
epistaxis, nosebleed - bleeding from the nose
ulemorrhagia - bleeding of the gums
Translations
نَزْفٌ
krvácejícíkrvácení
blødning
blæîandi
sangramento
kanayan

bleeding

[ˈbliːdɪŋ]
A. ADJ
1. [wound etc] → sangrante (fig) [heart] → dolorido
2. (Brit) → condenado, puñetero
B. ADV (Brit) bleeding awkwardcondenadamente difícil
C. N (= medical procedure) → sangría f; (= blood loss) → desangramiento m, hemorragia f

bleeding

[ˈbliːdɪŋ]
n (internal, menstrual)saignement m; (more serious)hémorragie f
adj (British)maudit(e) before nbleeding edge n (= cutting edge) → avant-garde fbleeding-edge [ˌbliːdɪŋˈɛdʒ] modif (= cutting-edge) [technology] → de pointebleeding heart bleeding-heart [ˌbliːdɪŋˈhɑːrt]
nâme f sensible
adj [conservative, leftist, sentimentalist, sentimentalism] → plein(e) de bons sentiments bleeding-heart liberalbleeding-heart liberal nlibéral m au cœur tendre, libéral m au grand cœur

bleeding

n
(= loss of blood)Blutung f; internal bleedinginnere Blutungen pl
(= taking blood)Aderlass m
(of plant)Blutung f, → Schwitzen nt
(of brakes)Lüftung f
adj
wound, nose, gumsblutend; (fig) heartgebrochen
(Brit inf) → verdammt (inf), → Scheiß- (inf); (in positive sense) miracle etcverdammt (inf); get your bleeding hands offnimm deine Dreckpfoten weg (inf)
adv (Brit inf) → verdammt (inf); that’s bleeding marvellousdas ist ja wieder toll! (inf), → na klasse! (inf); who does he/she think he/she bleeding well is?für was hält sich der Kerl/die Kuh eigentlich? (inf); not bleeding likelywohl kaum (inf)

bleeding

[ˈbliːdɪŋ]
1. adj
a. (wound, person) → sanguinante
bleeding gums → le gengive che sanguinano
b. (Brit) (fam) → dannato/a, maledetto/a
you bleeding idiot! → pezzo di cretino!
2. nperdita di sangue; (serious) → emorragia

bleed

(bliːd) past tense, past participle bled (bled) verb
to lose blood. Her nose was bleeding badly.
ˈbleeding adjective
losing blood. a bleeding wound.

bleed·ing

n. sangrado, hemorragia;
___ disorderstrastornos hemorrágicos;
___ from an arteryhemorragia arterial;
___ from the vagina___ vaginal;
___ from the nose___ por la nariz, epistaxis;
___ pileshemorroides;
___ tendencydiátesis hemorrágica;
___ rectalrectorrhagia;
life threatening ___hemorragia con peligro mortal.

bleeding

adj sangrante; — ulcer úlcera sangrante; n hemorragia, sangrado; dysfunctional uterine — hemorragia uterina disfuncional; menstrual — sangrado menstrual
References in classic literature ?
Weak from suffering and loss of blood, he would have fallen but for the strong arm that caught him.
So she bled him, and he fell into a stupor which lasted nearly all that day, so that he awoke weak and exhausted from loss of blood.
Slowly but surely was Norman of Torn cutting Peter of Colfax to pieces; little by little, and with such fiendish care that except for loss of blood, the man was in no way crippled; nor did the outlaw touch his victim's face with his gleaming sword; that he was saving for the fulfillment of his design.
Everything seemed so futile and insignificant in comparison with the stern and solemn train of thought that weakness from loss of blood, suffering, and the nearness of death aroused in him.
He had been rather badly mauled by one of the lions; but was now able to walk alone, though he was extremely weak from shock and loss of blood.
When our men retreated, they left the Spaniard and the Englishman that were killed behind them: and the savages, when they came up to them, killed them over again in a wretched manner, breaking their arms, legs, and heads, with their clubs and wooden swords, like true savages; but finding our men were gone, they did not seem inclined to pursue them, but drew themselves up in a ring, which is, it seems, their custom, and shouted twice, in token of their victory; after which, they had the mortification to see several of their wounded men fall, dying with the mere loss of blood.
The birds had been driven down into this corner the day before by some shooting-party; and while those that had dropped dead under the shot, or had died before nightfall, had been searched for and carried off, many badly wounded birds had escaped and hidden themselves away, or risen among the thick boughs, where they had maintained their position till they grew weaker with loss of blood in the night-time, when they had fallen one by one as she had heard them.
Soundless, as it had fought, it died, and though weak from pain and loss of blood, it was with an emotion of triumphant pride that I stepped across its convulsively stiffening corpse to snatch up the most potent secret of a world.
They soon had me patched up so that, except for weakness from loss of blood and a little soreness around the wound, I suffered no great distress from this thrust which, under earthly treatment, undoubtedly would have put me flat on my back for days.
After a bit I began to grow anxious, for the loss of blood was telling on Arthur, strong man as he was.
His face was pale with his wound and with loss of blood, like the moon in broad daylight, and his fair hair was clotted in points upon his forehead, where the blood had hardened.
Of the three hundred and seventy men who had held the crest, one hundred and seventy-two were left standing, many of whom were sorely wounded and weak from loss of blood.