Lost Generation


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Lost Generation

n (sometimes not capitals)
1. (Historical Terms) the large number of talented young men killed in World War I
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) the generation of writers, esp American authors such as Scott Fitzgerald and Hemingway, active after World War I

Lost′ Genera′tion


n. (often l.c.)
1. the generation that came of age during or just after World War I, viewed as cynical and disillusioned.
2. a group of American writers of this generation.
[1925–30]
References in periodicals archive ?
Until children's rights to education in the Rohingya crisis are realised, we face the threat of a lost generation of what is already one of the world's most vulnerable populations," Smith added.
From their work and their studies, they recommended educative digital games as one of the solutions since games will help in diminishing the educational and psychological gaps in this lost generation.
The EU funds are offering a life-line to children and youth, many of whom have seen their homes, schools and lives torn apart and who risk becoming a lost generation, said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake.
It's high time this incompetent Government pulled its finger out and started helping our children or we are going to end up with a lost generation.
This will result in another lost generation to decades of unemployment and poverty.
The meeting was briefed that the Second Rehabilitation Project aims at overcoming the aging problems and regaining the lost generation capacity of 50 MW with reliable annual energy generation of 1.
But we are also hoping that we can find a lost generation of players who are maybe in their late 30s or early 40s.
And the work of the young students has gone on show for a month in the Lost Generation exhibition at Batley Art Gallery.
They are in danger of becoming a lost generation and need much greater help as a matter of urgency.
These same scoundrels are responsible for another lost generation of unemployed youngsters and young men and women trying to make ends meet in dead-end jobs.
He said: "Black English players have had amazing careers and I don't want this to be a lost generation.
He concludes by applying his recontextualization to four familiar texts by Miller, Durrell, Smart, and Duncan, and encourages readers to re-engage the lost generation using this new critical lens.