occultation

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oc·cul·ta·tion

 (ŏk′ŭl-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of occulting or the state of being occulted.
2. Astronomy
a. The passage of a celestial object across the line of sight between an observer and another celestial object, as when the moon moves between Earth and the sun in a solar eclipse.
b. The progressive blocking and unblocking of light or other electromagnetic radiation from a celestial source during such a passage: a lunar occultation of a quasar; a planetary occultation of a star.
c. An observational technique for determining the position or radiant structure of a celestial source undergoing such occultation or of the object causing the occultation.
3. Islam The temporary, supernatural removal of a holy person from visible existence, as Shiites believe is the case with the 12th imam.

[Middle English occultacion, from Latin occultātiō, occultātiōn-, from occultātus, past participle of occultāre, frequentative of occulere, to conceal; see occult.]

occultation

(ˌɒkʌlˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Astronomy) the temporary disappearance of one celestial body as it moves out of sight behind another body
2. the act of occulting or the state of being occulted

oc•cul•ta•tion

(ˌɒk ʌlˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the passage of one celestial body in front of another, thus hiding the other from view: applied esp. to the moon's coming between an observer and a star or planet.
2. the act of blocking or hiding from view.
3. the resulting hidden or concealed state.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin occultātiō concealment]

oc·cul·ta·tion

(ŏk′ŭl-tā′shən)
The passage of a celestial object between an observer and another celestial object, blocking the second object from view. An occultation occurs when the moon moves between Earth and the sun in a solar eclipse.

occultation

- One of its meanings is "the disappearance from view of a star or planet in the sun's rays after sunset or before sunrise, when the star or planet is above the horizon."
See also related terms for sunset.

occultation

the process of one heavenly body disappearing behind another as viewed by an observer.
See also: Astronomy, Planets
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.occultation - one celestial body obscures anotheroccultation - one celestial body obscures another
egress, emersion - (astronomy) the reappearance of a celestial body after an eclipse
ingress, immersion - (astronomy) the disappearance of a celestial body prior to an eclipse
break, interruption - some abrupt occurrence that interrupts an ongoing activity; "the telephone is an annoying interruption"; "there was a break in the action when a player was hurt"
solar eclipse - the moon interrupts light from the sun
lunar eclipse - the earth interrupts light shining on the moon
total eclipse - an eclipse as seen from a place where the eclipsed body is completely obscured
partial eclipse - an eclipse in which the eclipsed body is only partially obscured
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The moon is going through a period of occultation, called a lunar occultation.
The next lunar occultation of Uranus visible from southern Africa is on 2045 March 02.
While JS was carrying out research into the life of Thomas Hinsley Astbury (1858-1922; Figure 1), an unusual observation came to light that Astbury made of Saturn during the lunar occultation on 1900 September 3, which might be of interest to readers, especially planetary observers.
There have been many nighttime lunar occultation of Venus, but this time it is special as it is happening in broad daylight.
We have again relied on the minor planet predictions provided by Steve Preston and have used the Occult4 software for lunar occultation predictions.
ASTROPHYSICAL POINT SOURCE DETECTION VIA LUNAR OCCULTATION.
In particular, the lunar occultation method offers a powerful means of identifying binaries among obscured, dust-enshrouded young stars.
A lunar occultation, in which the Moon hides a star or planet, is the commonest kind and the easiest to see.
Once every 18 years, lunar occultation gives observers an opportunity to sharpen the resolution.
Except in one instance: during a grazing lunar occultation of a bright red or orange star--in particular Aldebaran, the 1st-magnitude eye of Taurus.
One specific event was a lunar occultation of Jupiter on 2012 July 15, which for observers in south and east England would have been a graze along the Moon's northern limb.