Lupinus perennis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lupinus perennis - stout perennial of eastern and central North America having palmate leaves and showy racemose blue flowersLupinus perennis - stout perennial of eastern and central North America having palmate leaves and showy racemose blue flowers
genus Lupinus, Lupinus - herbs or shrubs: lupin
subshrub, suffrutex - low-growing woody shrub or perennial with woody base
References in periodicals archive ?
007 + Tephrosia virginiana * Group Pair Species Abandoned Pteridium aquilinum Bracken Fern + Managed Pedicularis canadensis Wood Betony Potentilla simplex Cinquefoil Disturbed Lupinus perennis Wild Lupine + Managed Andropogon gerardii Big Bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium Litde Bluestem Asclepias syriaca Common Milkweed Krigia virginica False Dandelion Specificity Fidelity Group Pair Species (A) (B) Abandoned Pteridium aquilinum 0.
Digitaria filiformis, Lupinus perennis, and Panicum lindheimeri) also were present.
Lupinus perennis (Table 2) is a prime example of a potentially threatened plant species that also serves as a host for the larvae of the Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis), itself a nationally endangered species (Grundel and others 1998).
Among legumes, Lupinus perennis had significant effects in all 9 tests, Lespedeza capitat in 6 tests, and Petalostemum in 2 tests.
In this study, our objectives were to estimate predation rate on Lupinus perennis seeds by mice, identify any vegetation characteristic that increased seed predation, and to observe if it was correlated with prescribed burning.
Abundant forbs were Agalinis tenuifolia (slender gerardia), Aster oolentangiensis, Comandra umbellata (star toadflax), Conyza canadensis (horseweed), Eupborbia corollata (flowering spurge), Fragaria virginiana, Lechea leggettii (pinweed), Lupinus perennis (wild lupine), Phlox pilosa (prairie phlox), Potentilla simplex, Pleridium aquilinum, Rubus flagellaris, and Solidago nemoralis (gray goldenrod).
Its decline is related to loss and modification of savanna and barrens habitats where its larval host plant, wild lupine, Lupinus perennis, occurs (Schweitzer, 1994).