Lwów

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Lwów

(lvuf)
n
(Placename) the Polish name for Lvov
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Beloved widower of Jozia (who passed in 2009), loving brother of Janek, devoted father of Irene, Krysia and Andrzej, dearly loved grandfather of Ceinwen, Rhianedd, Brynmore and Freya and great-grandfather of Ellie, embracing Jan, Kristian, Sean, Paul and remembering the wider family in Poland, Lwow and Canada.
Yet Amar does not link the city's new but quite different Soviet-Ukrainian character to the manner in which the basic preconditions for it were created, nor to the fact that prior to that Lwow was indeed a very different Ukrainian city, or rather, was not a Ukrainian city at all.
Founded by Michele DeStefano and hosted through the University of Miami Law School, where she teaches, LWOW challenges students from thirty law and business schools from fifteen countries to work in small teams to design and pitch creative solutions to a wide variety of legal/business, compliance/ethics, legal practice, and social justice issues.
The first session was addressed by the Vice-Rector of Ivan Franko National University of Lviv and the Vice-Consul of the Republic of Poland before offering several academic presentations on the civilizational Other in Conrad's oeuvre; an imagological approach to "The Lagoon" and "Karain"; cinematic adaptations of Nostromo and The Secret Agent; and a historical study of Joseph Conrad's Lwow.
He was born in Lwow, Poland, then known as Lemberg (before 1918 so it was still part of the Austro-Hungarian empire) and now is part of the Ukraine and known as Lviv.
As Seton-Watson informed a curious Watson Kirkconnell several years later, the dissertation "was an excellent piece of work so far as it went," but Kysilewsky was "considerably handicapped by limitations of research in London, and political reasons had made it difficult for him to fill in the gaps in his studies in Lwow and elsewhere.
The lives of the microbiologists--Rudolf Weigl, a German zoologist, and Ludwig Fleck, a Jewish physician--intersected in Lwow, eastern Poland.
The lights were turned off again, and there was more singing by firelight--songs of the cities over the borders in Ukraine and Lithuania and lost to Poland, including Lwow and Wilno.
22) Leon Wells, a survivor of the Janowska transit camp near Lwow, Poland, has left behind valuable memoirs of his horrifying experiences and subsequent life-long spiritual struggle.
In 1938 the Poles: Jan Stefan Raszek and Franciszek Groer, practicing at the Jan Kazimierz University of Lwow, performed the first bone marrow transplantation.