mob


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

MOB

abbr.
mother of the bride

mob

 (mŏb)
n.
1. A large and often disorderly crowd. See Synonyms at crowd1.
2. The mass of common people; the populace.
3. often Mob Informal A criminal organization, especially the Mafia operating in the United States.
4. An indiscriminate or loosely associated group of things: a mob of boats in the harbor.
5. Australian A flock or herd of animals.
tr.v. mobbed, mob·bing, mobs
1. To crowd around and jostle or annoy, especially in anger or excessive enthusiasm: Eager fans mobbed the popular singer.
2. To crowd into: Visitors mobbed the fairgrounds.

[Short for mobile, from Latin mōbile (vulgus), fickle (crowd), neuter of mōbilis; see mobile.]

mob′bish adj.
mob′bish·ly adv.

mob

(mɒb)
n
1.
a. a riotous or disorderly crowd of people; rabble
b. (as modifier): mob law; mob violence.
2. often derogatory a group or class of people, animals, or things
3. (Agriculture) Austral and NZ a flock (of sheep) or a herd (of cattle, esp when droving)
4. often derogatory the masses
5. slang a gang of criminals
vb (tr) , mobs, mobbing or mobbed
6. to attack in a group resembling a mob
7. to surround, esp in order to acclaim: they mobbed the film star.
8. to crowd into (a building, plaza, etc)
9. (Zoology) (of a group of animals of a prey species) to harass (a predator)
[C17: shortened from Latin mōbile vulgus the fickle populace; see mobile]
ˈmobber n
ˈmobbish adj

MOB

abbreviation for
(Telecommunications) mobile phone

mob

(mɒb)

n., v. mobbed, mob•bing. n.
1. a disorderly or riotous crowd of people.
2. a crowd bent on or engaged in lawless violence.
3. any large group of persons or things.
4. the common people; the masses.
5. Informal. a criminal gang, esp. one involved in organized crime.
v.t.
6. to crowd around noisily, as from curiosity or hostility: Fans mobbed the actor.
7. to attack in a riotous mob: The crowd mobbed the consulate.
8. to fill with people; crowd.
[1680–90; short for Latin mōbile vulgus the movable (i.e., changeable, inconstant) common people]
mob′ber, n.
mob′bish, adj.
mob′bism, n.

Mob

See also crowds.

the behavior of a mob. — mobbish, adj. — mobbishly, adv.
a reverence for and veneration of the mob.
a rule or government by a mob. — ochlocrat, n. — ochlocratie, ochlocratical, adj.
an abnormal fear of crowds or mobs. — ochlophobe, n. — ochlophobic, adj.

Mob

 a rabble, 1688; a crowd or collection of things. See also canaille, flock, herd.

mob


Past participle: mobbed
Gerund: mobbing

Imperative
mob
mob
Present
I mob
you mob
he/she/it mobs
we mob
you mob
they mob
Preterite
I mobbed
you mobbed
he/she/it mobbed
we mobbed
you mobbed
they mobbed
Present Continuous
I am mobbing
you are mobbing
he/she/it is mobbing
we are mobbing
you are mobbing
they are mobbing
Present Perfect
I have mobbed
you have mobbed
he/she/it has mobbed
we have mobbed
you have mobbed
they have mobbed
Past Continuous
I was mobbing
you were mobbing
he/she/it was mobbing
we were mobbing
you were mobbing
they were mobbing
Past Perfect
I had mobbed
you had mobbed
he/she/it had mobbed
we had mobbed
you had mobbed
they had mobbed
Future
I will mob
you will mob
he/she/it will mob
we will mob
you will mob
they will mob
Future Perfect
I will have mobbed
you will have mobbed
he/she/it will have mobbed
we will have mobbed
you will have mobbed
they will have mobbed
Future Continuous
I will be mobbing
you will be mobbing
he/she/it will be mobbing
we will be mobbing
you will be mobbing
they will be mobbing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mobbing
you have been mobbing
he/she/it has been mobbing
we have been mobbing
you have been mobbing
they have been mobbing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mobbing
you will have been mobbing
he/she/it will have been mobbing
we will have been mobbing
you will have been mobbing
they will have been mobbing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mobbing
you had been mobbing
he/she/it had been mobbing
we had been mobbing
you had been mobbing
they had been mobbing
Conditional
I would mob
you would mob
he/she/it would mob
we would mob
you would mob
they would mob
Past Conditional
I would have mobbed
you would have mobbed
he/she/it would have mobbed
we would have mobbed
you would have mobbed
they would have mobbed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mob - a disorderly crowd of peoplemob - a disorderly crowd of people  
crowd - a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers"
lynch mob - a mob that kills a person for some presumed offense without legal authority
2.mob - a loose affiliation of gangsters in charge of organized criminal activitiesmob - a loose affiliation of gangsters in charge of organized criminal activities
gangdom, gangland, organized crime - underworld organizations
Cosa Nostra, Maffia, Mafia - a crime syndicate in the United States; organized in families; believed to have important relations to the Sicilian Mafia
3.mob - an association of criminalsmob - an association of criminals; "police tried to break up the gang"; "a pack of thieves"
association - a formal organization of people or groups of people; "he joined the Modern Language Association"
nest - a gang of people (criminals or spies or terrorists) assembled in one locality; "a nest of thieves"
youth gang - a gang whose members are teenagers
gangdom, gangland, organized crime - underworld organizations
gangster, mobster - a criminal who is a member of gang
Verb1.mob - press tightly together or crammob - press tightly together or cram; "The crowd packed the auditorium"
crowd together, crowd - to gather together in large numbers; "men in straw boaters and waxed mustaches crowded the verandah"

mob

noun
1. crowd, pack, collection, mass, body, press, host, gathering, drove, gang, flock, herd, swarm, horde, multitude, throng, assemblage a growing mob of demonstrators
2. masses, rabble, hoi polloi, scum, great unwashed (informal & derogatory), riffraff, canaille (French), commonalty If they continue like this there is a danger of the mob taking over.
3. (Slang) gang, company, group, set, lot, troop, crew (informal) Can you stop your mob tramping all over the place?
verb
1. surround, besiege, overrun, jostle, fall on, set upon, crowd around, swarm around Her car was mobbed by the media.
2. crowd into, fill, crowd, pack, jam, cram into, fill to overflowing Demonstrators mobbed the streets.

mob

noun
1. An enormous number of persons gathered together:
2. The common people:
common (used in plural), commonality, commonalty, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), populace, public, ruck, third estate.
3. Informal. An organized group of criminals, hoodlums, or wrongdoers:
4. A very large number of things grouped together:
verb
1. To congregate, as around a person:
2. To fill to excess by compressing or squeezing tightly:
Informal: jam-pack.
Translations
غَوْغاء، رَعاعيَتَجَمْهَر حَوْل
davobklopit
pøbelpuffe
mobata
csőcselék
gera aîsúg aîskríll, lÿîur
apstumdytigrumdytinusikaltėlių gauja
barspūlisstumdīt, grūstīt
drhalmnožica
başına üşüşmeketrafını sarmakgüruhtaşkın kalabalık

mob

[mɒb]
A. N
1. (= crowd) → multitud f, muchedumbre f, bola f (Mex); (= rabble) → populacho m, turba f (esp LAm)
some houses were burnt by the mobsunas casas fueron incendiadas por el populacho
the army has become a mobel ejército se ha transformado en una turba incontrolada
they went in a mob to the town hallfueron en tropel al ayuntamiento
to join the mobecharse a las calles
they're a hard-drinking mobson una pandilla de borrachos
2. the mob (pej) (= the masses) → el populacho
3. (= criminal gang) → pandilla f
Joe and his mobJoe y su pandilla
the Mob (US) → la Mafia
4. (Mil) which mob were you in?¿en qué regimiento estuviste?
B. VT
1. (= attack) → asaltar
2. (= surround) he was mobbed whenever he went outal salir siempre se veía acosado por la gente
the minister was mobbed by journalistslos periodistas se apiñaban en torno al ministro
C. CPD mob oratory Ndemagogia f populachera
mob rule Nley f de la calle

mob

[ˈmɒb]
n
(= large group) [people, reporters, fans] → foule f
[rioters, protesters, attackers] → foule f
Their car was stoned by an angry mob → Leur voiture fut caillassée par une foule en colère.
the mob (= the mass of the people) → la populace
the Mob (= organized crime) → la pègre mob boss
vt [+ celebrity] → assaillirmob boss nchef m/f de la pègre

mob

n
(= crowd)Horde f, → Schar f; (riotous, violent) → Mob m no pl; an undisciplined mobein undisziplinierter Haufen; a mob gathered to burn the housesder Mob or Pöbel lief zusammen, um die Häuser zu verbrennen; the crowd became a mobdas Volk wurde zur wütenden Menge; they went in a mob to the town hallsie stürmten zum Rathaus
(inf) (= criminal gang)Bande f; (fig: = clique) → Haufen m, → Bande f; which mob were you in? (Mil) → bei welchem Haufen warst du denn? (inf); the Mob (= the Mafia)die Maf(f)ia
the mob (pej: = the masses) → die Masse (→ n pl)
vtherfallen über (+acc), → sich stürzen auf (+acc); actor, pop star alsobelagern; the prisoner was mobbeddie Menge fiel über den Gefangenen her

mob

[mɒb]
1. n (of people) → folla, massa; (disorderly) → calca; (rioting, violent) → folla inferocita (fam) (criminal gang) → cricca, banda
the mob (pej) (Mafia) → la Mafia; (rabble) → la plebaglia
2. vt (person) → assalire, accalcarsi intorno a; (place) → prendere d'assalto, accalcarsi intorno a

mob

(mob) noun
a noisy, violent or disorderly crowd of people. He was attacked by an angry mob.
verbpast tense, past participle mobbed
(of a crowd) to surround and push about in a disorderly way. The singer was mobbed by a huge crowd of his fans.
References in classic literature ?
In order to show what a fierce and dangerous spirit was now aroused among the inhabitants, Grandfather related a passage from history which we shall call The Hutchinson Mob.
Here is that mob, the dregs of the people," he thought as he gazed at the crowd: "this rabble they have roused by their folly
Children was heeling it ahead of the mob, screaming and trying to get out of the way; and every window along the road was full of women's heads, and there was nigger boys in every tree, and bucks and wenches looking over every fence; and as soon as the mob would get nearly to them they would break and skaddle back out of reach.
I could see that the whole thing was a vain and unreasoning pursuit; and what, at the first glance, seemed to me the ugliest feature in this mob of roulette players was their respect for their occupation--the seriousness, and even the humility, with which they stood around the gaming tables.
The Pickwickians had no sooner dismounted than they were surrounded by a branch mob of the honest and independent, who forthwith set up three deafening cheers, which being responded to by the main body (for it's not at all necessary for a crowd to know what they are cheering about), swelled into a tremendous roar of triumph, which stopped even the red-faced man in the balcony.
At first the tumult of my own thoughts, summoned by the danger-signal and swarming to the rescue from every quarter of my skull, kept up such a hurrah and confusion and fifing and drumming that I couldn't take in a word; but presently when my mob of gathering plans began to crystallize and fall into position and form line of battle, a sort of order and quiet ensued and I caught the boom of the king's batteries, as if out of remote distance:
Giles's, to search for contraband goods, and the mob fired on the musketeers, and the musketeers fired on the mob, and nobody thought any of these occurrences much out of the common way.
But in each of us there lurks some particle of the mob spirit, of the mob temperament.
As a vast herd of cows in a rich farmer's yard, if, while they are milked, they hear their calves at a distance, lamenting the robbery which is then committing, roar and bellow; so roared forth the Somersetshire mob an hallaloo, made up of almost as many squalls, screams, and other different sounds as there were persons, or indeed passions among them: some were inspired by rage, others alarmed by fear, and others had nothing in their heads but the love of fun; but chiefly Envy, the sister of Satan, and his constant companion, rushed among the crowd, and blew up the fury of the women; who no sooner came up to Molly than they pelted her with dirt and rubbish.
As it rarely happens that public opinion, in its whimsical flights, does not identify a principle with a man, thus the people saw the personification of the Republic in the two stern figures of the brothers De Witt, those Romans of Holland, spurning to pander to the fancies of the mob, and wedding themselves with unbending fidelity to liberty without licentiousness, and prosperity without the waste of superfluity; on the other hand, the Stadtholderate recalled to the popular mind the grave and thoughtful image of the young Prince William of Orange.
Father was branded as a nihilist and an anarchist, and in one cartoon that was copied widely he was portrayed waving a red flag at the head of a mob of long-haired, wild-eyed men who bore in their hands torches, knives, and dynamite bombs.
Behind the police rearguard, at a respectful distance, was an orderly but vociferous mob, several blocks in length, that congested the street from sidewalk to sidewalk.