Macpherson


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Mac·pher·son

 (mək-fûr′sən), James 1736-1796.
Scottish poet who claimed to have translated the works of Ossian, a third-century Gaelic poet and warrior. Although based on unauthenticated original texts, the translations influenced many writers.

Macpherson

(məkˈfɜːsən)
n
(Biography) James. 1736–96, Scottish poet and translator. He published supposed translations of the legendary Gaelic poet Ossian, in reality largely his own work

Mac•pher•son

(məkˈfɜr sən)

n.
James, 1736–96, Scottish author.
References in classic literature ?
In a lonely Highland village more than a hundred and fifty years ago there lived a little boy called James Macpherson.
By this time James Macpherson had begun to write poetry.
So now people begged Macpherson to travel through the Highlands and gather together as much of the old poetry of the people as he could.
For four months Macpherson wandered about the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, listening to the tales of the people and writing them down.
At the same time I read the literature of the subject, and gave the pretensions of Macpherson an unquestioning faith.
Old MacPherson said he could work ut by hond, but very slow ot thot.
James MacPherson who used to live behind the graveyard.
CECILY:--"This is Cousin Ebenezer MacPherson on the Markdale road.
Diana Barry, rosy and dimpled, shadowed by the faithful Fred; Jane Andrews, neat and sensible and plain; Ruby Gillis, looking her handsomest and brightest in a cream silk blouse, with red geraniums in her golden hair; Gilbert Blythe and Charlie Sloane, both trying to keep as near the elusive Anne as possible; Carrie Sloane, looking pale and melancholy because, so it was reported, her father would not allow Oliver Kimball to come near the place; Moody Spurgeon MacPherson, whose round face and objectionable ears were as round and objectionable as ever; and Billy Andrews, who sat in a corner all the evening, chuckled when any one spoke to him, and watched Anne Shirley with a grin of pleasure on his broad, freckled countenance.
Now Cluny Macpherson, the chief of the clan Vourich, had been one of the leaders of the great rebellion six years before; there was a price on his life; and I had supposed him long ago in France, with the rest of the heads of that desperate party.
It's a lesson to you that you can't deceive me, Constable MacPherson," said Lestrade, with dignity.
And oh, Marilla, Jane Andrews told me that Minnie MacPherson told her that she heard Prissy Andrews tell Sara Gillis that I had a very pretty nose.