Marquise de Pompadour

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Noun1.Marquise de Pompadour - French noblewoman who was the lover of Louis XV, whose policies she influenced (1721-1764)Marquise de Pompadour - French noblewoman who was the lover of Louis XV, whose policies she influenced (1721-1764)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Louis XV room held quantities of Sevres porcelain, including pieces that belonged to Madame de Pompadour.
The old chateau soon became unable to cope with the workload so in 1756, and at huge expense, plant and workers were transferred to a massive new factory at Sevres, located strategically near to its most important patron, Madame de Pompadour.
1721: Madame de Pompadour, infamous mistress of Louis XV, was born in Paris.
Which former home of Madame de Pompadour became the official residence of the French President in 1873?
A DESK believed to have once been owned by Madame de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV of France, has sold for more than PS3 million at auction, setting a record for a piece by the French furniture maker who created it.
TODAY CONSTITUTION DAY (IRELAND) 1721: Madame de Pompadour, infamous mistress of Louis XV, was born in Paris.
It was created within the former entrance arches of the original Princes Street Station and named after Louis XV's mistress, Madame de Pompadour, when it opened in 1914.
It was advised that Madame de Pompadour use chocolate with ambergris to stimulate her desire for Louis XV.
Danry de Latude used another trick to ingratiate himself with Madame de Pompadour, the first lady at the court of Louis XV: He sent her a fake bomb and warned her against a dangerous conspiracy,.
Bafta-winning writer and childhood Doctor Who fan Moffat has already penned some of the most critically rated recent episodes of the sci-fi show, including The Girl in the Fireplace, about the 18th-century French aristocrat Madame de Pompadour.
In Paris, for example, Casanova, a part-time alchemist, hobnobbed with the likes of Madame de Pompadour and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
Thus, by the end of 1753, Madame de Pompadour, Louis XVI's canny mistress - an astute woman possessing huge common sense, surrounded by effete, inbred aristocratic nincompoops - was showing the world what France could do in the porcelain business.