Maewo


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Maewo

(mɑːˈeɪwəʊ)
n
(Placename) an almost uninhabited island in Vanuatu. Also called: Aurora
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References in periodicals archive ?
Recently there was also a very serious case on Maewo where a chiefly council decided to attack two men because they had been suspected of tormenting the staff at the Gambule Junior Secondary School in Maewo Island with black magic.
At the same time as the vampire case took everyone by surprise, one was struck by the killing of the two sorcerers in Maewo island and also of the possible killing of two escaped prisoners.
Antioco variant (1342A [right arrow] G); and Maewo (1360C [right arrow] T).
Some islands have nothing of the sort, whereas others, such as Ambrym, Maewo and the towns of Port Vila and Luganville are rife with sorcery (see Forsyth 2006; Rio 2002).
The graded society is the dominant traditional socio-political institution of the islands to the north of the archipelago including Malekula, Vao, North and Central Pentecost, Aoba, Maewo and Ambrym as well as those islands further to the north such as the Banks Islands (Allen, 1981 b; 1984; Blackwood, 1981; Deacon, 1970; Erikson, 2008; Layard, 1942; Taylor, 2005; Tonkinson, 1981).
10) Mugarimanga and her children resided between the two islands of Maewo and Pentecost.
In 1976-77 Peter Crowe, an ethno-musicologist from the University of Auckland, now resident in France, undertook research into the traditional music of Ambae and Maewo.
The thesis concentrated on agricultural intensification and human impact on the environment of Aneityum, the southern-most inhabited island of the archipelago, as well as ethno-archaeological study of irrigation systems on the northern island of Maewo (Spriggs 1981, 1986).
Traditionally, however, like all Oceanic peoples, the people of Ambae were very much a seafaring people, using canoes not only for travel to other parts of the island and the nearby, visible islands of Maewo and Pentecost, but for much lengthier journeys to distant islands, for which they required considerable navigation skills.
He was travelling from the nearby island of Maewo to Santo, taking yams to feed his pigs there.
For example, rows of cupules found in the caves of Malakula, Maewo and Erromango are among the most dominant motif arrangements in the engraved rock-art.