magic realism

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magic realism

or

magical realism

n
1. (Art Terms) a style of painting or writing that depicts images or scenes of surreal fantasy in a representational or realistic way
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a style of painting or writing that depicts images or scenes of surreal fantasy in a representational or realistic way
magic realist, magical realist n

mag′ic

(or mag′ical) re′alism,


n.
an artistic style in which often fantastic images or events are depicted in a sharply realistic manner.

magic realism

Originally used in the 1920s to describe paintings which combined surreal fantasy with matter-of-fact representation; adapted for more recent literary work which combines documentary realism with imaginative fantasies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magic realism - a literary or artistic genre in which realistic narrative or meticulously realistic painting are combined with surreal elements of fantasy or dreamsmagic realism - a literary or artistic genre in which realistic narrative or meticulously realistic painting are combined with surreal elements of fantasy or dreams
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
References in periodicals archive ?
She has bold projects in mind, to 'write around the themes of womanhood and family,' then 'dip into the waters of young adult, historical and magic realist fiction.
As the Mexican Frieda Kahlo, in her surrealist and magic realist paintings, employed the fragmented memories of her scarred life, riddled with physical illness and emotional pain, so does Grace Katigbak-but with one distinctive difference: the pain from her heart slipping through her fingers holding the brush converges with the joy of healing, her personal redemption, which has stayed and contained what otherwise would have been a tragic life.
Finally, a no less compelling conversation piece, La Lettera of 1925, comes courtesy of the 'rediscovered' Magic Realist painter known as Cagnaccio di San Pietro, on show at Antonacci Lapiccirella Fine Art.
Others are more creative: The @MagicRealismBot (with close to 40,000 followers, certainly including a good number of bots) has been programmed to randomly build and tweet sentences every two hours that imitate the writings of magic realist novelists such as Jorge Luis Borges or Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
Taking up carnivalesque and magic realist elements in order to further political critiques of a nation mismanaged by men, Ronfard's adaptations of King Lear and Richard III integrate feminist conversations that developed in the 1970s.
In the language of narration in a magic realist text, a battle between two oppositional systems takes place, each working toward the creation of a different kind of fictional world from the other.
Other titles include YaE1/2l Andre's "When I Will Be Dictator," a curio that defies categorization, made up from hundreds of reels of Super-8 and Straight 8 mm film footage found in flea markets and junk piles, and Mark Cousins' 2009 magic realist documentary "The First Movie.
Every panel is devoted to working-class literature, Caribbean writers, Southern gothic writers, magic realist writers, neo-masculine writers, and lyrical essayists .
Few events, to my mind, seem more disposed to magic realist recounting than an Indian national election.
Instead, I concentrate on intersections between magic realist theory and unnatural narrative theory in their explanations of how readers account for the representation of unnatural events.
In the third chapter of Magic Realist Cinema in East Central Europe, Aga Skrodzka explains that her book was inspired by a course in World Cinema that she was asked to teach.
Among the topics are Melville's marvels of reality, a comparative reflection on magic realism in native and white Canadian prose, magic realist and utopian discourses in Margaret Sweatmans' When Alice Lay Down with Peter, a Jewish shtetl revisited in Lilian Nattel's The River Midnight, and the subversion of rationalism through feminine excess in Susan Swan's The Biggest Modern Woman of the World and Angela Carter's Nights at the Circus.