magnetic confinement


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magnetic confinement

n
(Nuclear Physics) another name for containment3
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion energy, building on several decades of worldwide research on the physics and technology of magnetic confinement.
As Thomson Reuters points out, most of the patent activity of ROSATOM in this period focused on several areas, including technologies of inertial confinement fusion and technologies of magnetic confinement of hot fusion plasma.
Magnetic confinement uses the electrical conductivity of the plasma to contain it with magnetic fields.
ITER and Wendelstein 7-X both use a fusion approach called magnetic confinement.
There is a plan to create an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France, which is a test magnetic confinement reactor built from the collaboration of the US, Russia, Europe, and Japan.
Since leaving the federal governments magnetic confinement fusion program and the field in the mid-1970s, Robert Hirsch has contributed a series of diatribes against the most successful concept being developed worldwide in that program.
The history of the tokamak--a magnetic confinement system for fusion reactors--goes back a long way.
Our compact fusion concept combines several alternative magnetic confinement approaches, taking the best parts of each, and offers a 90-percent size reduction over previous concepts," said Tom McGuire, compact fusion lead for the Skunk Works' Revolutionary Technology Programs, in October.
The graduate textbook explains the theory of charged particle motion in weakly inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields, how the magnetic confinement of a collisionless plasma works at an individual particle level, the ensemble-averaged kinetic equation, and how fluid equations are obtained by taking low-order moments of the kinetic equation.
This intermediate density space falls outside of the major research programs in magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion, and represents a high risk, high reward opportunity to identify new pathways to fusion power that may offer relatively inexpensive development cycles.
Magnetic confinement fusion uses magnetic fields to trap the fuel in a magnetic 'bottle,' and inertial confinement fusion heats the surface of the fuel pellet until it blows off in a way that causes the remaining pellet to implode.
Construction standards are being developed for magnetic confinement fusion energy devices and high-temperature reactors, and in-service inspection standards are being developed for both gas-cooled and liquid-metal-cooled nuclear power plants.