Mahound


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Mahound

(məˈhaʊnd; -ˈhuːnd)
n
(Biography) an archaic name for Mohammed
[C16: from Old French Mahun]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mahound - the Arab prophet who, according to Islam, was the last messenger of Allah (570-632)Mahound - the Arab prophet who, according to Islam, was the last messenger of Allah (570-632)
References in classic literature ?
They too are very hardy soldiers, the more so as for many hundred years they have had to fight hard against the cursed followers of the black Mahound, who have pressed upon them from the south, and still, as I understand, hold the fairer half of the country.
Oh Mohammed and Apollo, Mahound and Tervogant, The sharp blazons on this cloth-- If they, in fact, belong to me, I could be content in my heart That my family is a noble one; At least, it seems so to me, For I was wrapped up in these When I was found an abandoned babe.
The Satanic Verses has two parallel narratives: the magic realist world in which two Indian migrants, Saladin Chamcha and Gibreel Farishta, struggle for identity in multicultural London; and the dream sequences of Gibreel, occasioned by his crisis of religious faith, which provide a satirical revision of the Koran, in which the businessman Mahound establishes a new religion.
Why make ye Mahound this present And so disspice god omnipotent?
Iraq has dealt with all sorts of problems from Iran, but as the next Iranian general elections come closer, Prime Minister Mahound Ahmadinejad may well want to show that he can influence events in Iraq, and he may get the pro-Iranian religious leaders or militias to show their strength.
This transitory, fluid space becomes miraculous in the novel: characters start to fly in the air, Mahound (Muhammad) receives divine revelation on top of Mount Cone (Mount Hira), Allaluia meets the ghosts of famous mountain climbers on Everest, and so on.
In a sense, Rushdie was playing the same game with reference to the Muslim world by representing the Prophet of Islam as Mahound with a view to voicing the doubts of Iqbal, Ghazali, Khayaam.
Mahound, Rushdie's Prophet figure, is one of those who hear a voice in their ear asking, "What kind of idea are you?
If Mahound [the fictional name for Muhammad (28)] recited a verse in which God was described as all-hearing, all-knowing, I would write, all-knowing, all-wise.
He wanted to revenge himself with his sword, / He swore by Saint Mahound.
The book, published in 1987, gained notoriety in some Muslim communities for the way it depicted a prophet like figure, called Mahound; Mahound of The Satanic Verses was perceived by some devout believers to be a thinly veiled portrayal of the Prophet Muhammad.
The most prominent prophet figure is Mahound, who represents Mohammed.