Maimonides

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Mai·mon·i·des

 (mī-mŏn′ĭ-dēz′), Moses Originally Moses ben Maimon. Known as "Rambam." 1135?-1204.
Spanish-born Egyptian physician, rabbi, and philosopher who codified the Talmud in the Mishneh Torah (1170-1180) and attempted to reconcile Aristotelian philosophy with Jewish theology in Guide for the Perplexed (1190).

Maimonides

(maɪˈmɒnɪˌdiːz)
n
(Biography) also called Rabbi Moses ben Maimon. 1135–1204, Jewish philosopher, physician, and jurist, born in Spain. He codified Jewish law in Mishneh Torah (1180)
Maiˌmoniˈdean adj, n

Mai•mon•i•des

(maɪˈmɒn ɪˌdiz)

n.
(Moses ben Maimon) ( “RaMBaM” ), 1135–1204, Jewish philosopher and jurist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Maimonides - Spanish philosopher considered the greatest Jewish scholar of the Middle Ages who codified Jewish law in the Talmud (1135-1204)Maimonides - Spanish philosopher considered the greatest Jewish scholar of the Middle Ages who codified Jewish law in the Talmud (1135-1204)
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, Egypt has 19 synagogues: 10 in Alexandria and 9 in Cairo, but only three remain in operation: in Cairo, the Sha'ar Hashamayim Synagogue; the Maimonidies Synagogue; and the Ben-Ezra Synagogue in the Fustat area near the capital.
196) Rabbi Joseph Caro (197) explains that Maimonidies is applying this principle primarily in two cases; 1) where someone has sinned publicly and therefore the sin is already public knowledge, such that his speaking out only serves to inform people that he has repented; and 2) where someone has sinned against a fellow man and therefore must ask him for forgiveness.
32, [section] 138 (noting that if one has committed a wrong, he cannot be a witness); see also Maimonidies, Laws of Witnesses ch.
32, [subsection] 135-38; Maimonidies, Laws of Witnesses 12:2.
He quotes Maimonidies, (46) who ruled that if a town is besieged by an army that demands that one person be handed over to be killed in exchange for sparing the rest, it is impermissible to hand over the person, even though not doing so will result in the entire town being killed.
56) Maimonidies, however, illustrates an active violation of a commandment, (57) and ruled that societal needs did not trump individual religious obligations.