majoritarianism

(redirected from Majority vote)
Related to Majority vote: majority rule, Simple majority

ma·jor·i·tar·i·an·ism

 (mə-jôr′ĭ-târ′ē-ə-nĭz′əm, -jŏr′-)
n.
Rule by simple numerical majority in an organized group.

majoritarianism

(məˌdʒɒrɪˈtɛərɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a form of democracy which upholds the rule of the majority
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References in classic literature ?
majority vote on translating the Greek word "Aides" as "Hell"; but a
Some critics point out that state general obligation bonds require only a simple majority vote to pass.
Shareholders have approved 12 resolutions, which included the re-appointment of Rana Kapoor as MD & CEO of the bank with a majority vote of 99.
In addition, the Board adopted an amendment to the Company's Amended and Restated Bylaws (the "Bylaws") to implement a majority voting standard for uncontested director elections and a related amendment to the Company's Corporate Governance Guidelines to adopt a director resignation policy for directors who fail to receive a majority vote in an uncontested election.
Depending on the state, "supermajority" means there must be a three-fifths, two-thirds or three-fourths majority vote in both chambers.
The EMG data were used to calculate the time from the change in the contraction class to the classifier producing the wrist extension class output for five different analysis window length and majority vote combinations (Figure 8).
664 billion related to railways ministry which were rejected with majority vote in NA.
2 million for the firetruck will require a two-thirds majority vote at the town meeting and a majority vote as one of four questions on the Nov.
A blank can be created by majority vote, but can also be created in the motion by general consent upon the suggestion of a member or the chair.
At issue are rules that would require a majority vote to pass resolutions, including the approval of directors, executive pay and proposed acquisitions.
One problem with this approach is the difficulty of adding an amendment to the Constitution: it must be passed by a two-thirds majority vote by both houses of Congress and then ratified by three-fourths of the states.
Even if you had a majority vote against that director, it had no impact on whether or not that director could continue to serve.