Maldon


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Related to Maldon: Battle of Maldon

Mal·don

 (măl′dən)
A town of southeast England southwest of Colchester. In a bloody battle fought nearby, an invading Viking army defeated a smaller Anglo-Saxon force (991).

Maldon

(ˈmɔːldən)
n
(Placename) a market town in SE England, in Essex; scene of a battle (991) between the East Saxons and the victorious Danes, celebrated in The Battle of Maldon, an Old English poem; notable for Maldon salt, used in cookery. Pop: 20 731 (2001)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Maldon - a battle in which the Danes defeated the Saxons in 991; celebrated in an old English poem
England - a division of the United Kingdom
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References in classic literature ?
I could wish it done as soon as it can be done, Wickfield,' said Doctor Strong, 'for Jack Maldon is needy, and idle; and of those two bad things, worse things sometimes come.
Jack Maldon will never be very busy in getting either, I expect,' said Doctor Strong, rubbing his chin thoughtfully.
Maldon has come back, and he begs the favour of a word.
Jack Maldon as a modern Sindbad, and pictured him the bosom friend of all the Rajahs in the East, sitting under canopies, smoking curly golden pipes - a mile long, if they could be straightened out.
She tried a duet, once, with her cousin Maldon, but could not so much as begin; and afterwards, when she tried to sing by herself, although she began sweetly, her voice died away on a sudden, and left her quite distressed, with her head hanging down over the keys.
Strong had declined to play, on the ground of not feeling very well; and her cousin Maldon had excused himself because he had some packing to do.
Jack Maldon tried to be very talkative, but was not at his ease, and made matters worse.
Jack Maldon, you have a long voyage, and a strange country, before you; but many men have had both, and many men will have both, to the end of time.
Jack Maldon rattle past with an agitated face, and something cherry-coloured in his hand.
Jack Maldon had gone away, and how he had borne it, and how he had felt it, and all the rest of it.
Close inshore was a multitude of fishing smacks--English, Scotch, French, Dutch, and Swedish; steam launches from the Thames, yachts, electric boats; and beyond were ships of large burden, a multitude of filthy colliers, trim merchantmen, cattle ships, passenger boats, petroleum tanks, ocean tramps, an old white transport even, neat white and grey liners from Southampton and Hamburg; and along the blue coast across the Blackwater my brother could make out dimly a dense swarm of boats chaffering with the people on the beach, a swarm which also extended up the Blackwater almost to Maldon.
Most of the entries in the 'Chronicle' are bare and brief, but sometimes, especially in the accounts of Alfred's own splendid exploits, a writer is roused to spirited narrative, occasionally in verse; and in the tenth century two great battles against invading Northmen, at Brunanburh and Maldon, produced the only important extant pieces of Anglo-Saxon poetry which certainly belong to the West Saxon period.