malocclusion

(redirected from Malocclusions)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

mal·oc·clu·sion

 (măl′ə-klo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. Faulty contact between the upper and lower teeth when the jaw is closed.
2. An instance of such faulty contact.

malocclusion

(ˌmæləˈkluːʒən)
n
(Dentistry) dentistry a defect in the normal position of the upper and lower teeth when the mouth is closed, as from abnormal development of the jaw
ˌmalocˈcluded adj

mal•oc•clu•sion

(ˌmæl əˈklu ʒən)

n.
irregular contact of opposing teeth in the upper and lower jaws.
[1885–90]
mal`oc•clud′ed, adj.

mal·oc·clu·sion

(măl′ə-klo͞o′zhən)
A condition in which the upper and lower teeth do not meet properly; a faulty bite.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normallymalocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
dental medicine, dentistry, odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
disorder, upset - a physical condition in which there is a disturbance of normal functioning; "the doctor prescribed some medicine for the disorder"; "everyone gets stomach upsets from time to time"
overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
Translations

mal·oc·clu·sion

n. maloclusión, mordida defectuosa.

malocclusion

n maloclusión f
References in periodicals archive ?
Knowledge about the distribution of malocclusions in the population and the identification of factors and conditions associated with them allows the construction of models to understand their occurrence and to collaborate in the creation of public policies (4).
The psycho-social impact of malocclusions and treatment expectations of adolescent orthodontic patients.
Conclusion: Orthognathic treatment for the correction of Class II malocclusions has a positive effect on the perception of social characteristics of individuals.
1] According to McNamara, Class II malocclusions result mostly from a relative mandibular retrognathism rather than from a maxillary prognathism.
For malocclusions cephalograms are beneficial in quantifying skeletal and dental features2.
The possible indications for incisor extraction may be abnormalities in the number of anterior teeth, tooth size discrepancies, ectopic eruption of incisors, and moderate Class III malocclusions (3, 4).
This large market share can be attributed to the huge number of patients with malocclusions and jaw disorders in the patient category and increased adoption of fixed braces among adolescent children and teenagers.
The analysis of linear and angular parameters on the lateral cephalometric radiographs of patients with malocclusions class I, II and III revealed the difference in the value of the craniocervical angle between the groups, as well as the correlation between craniocervical angulation and parameters of the sagittal position and length of the jaws.
The relationship between malocclusions and middle ear diseases has aroused interest among medical and dental researchers.
The Balters Bionator is a functional appliance designed and introduced by Wilhelm Balters in 1960 and is still one of many functional removable appliances used for correction of Class II division 1 malocclusions (Illing, Morris, & Lee, 1998; Rudzki-Janson & Noachtar, 1998; Ahn, Kim, & Nahm, 2001).