Malthus


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Related to Malthus: Malthus theory

Mal·thus

 (măl′thəs), Thomas Robert 1766-1834.
British economist who wrote An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798), arguing that population tends to increase faster than food supply, with inevitably disastrous results, unless the increase in population is checked by moral restraints or by war, famine, and disease.

Mal·thu′sian (-tho͞o′zhən, -zē-ən) adj. & n.
Mal·thu′sian·ism n.

Malthus

(ˈmælθəs)
n
(Biography) Thomas Robert. 1766–1834, English economist. He propounded his population theory in An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798)

Mal•thus

(ˈmæl θəs)

n.
Thomas Robert, 1766–1834, English economist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Malthus - an English economist who argued that increases in population would outgrow increases in the means of subsistence (1766-1834)Malthus - an English economist who argued that increases in population would outgrow increases in the means of subsistence (1766-1834)
References in classic literature ?
Stepan Arkadyevitch described what grouse moors this Malthus had bought in the Tver province, and how they were preserved, and of the carriages and dogcarts in which the shooting party had been driven, and the luncheon pavilion that had been rigged up at the marsh.
Well, but I can tell you: your receiving some five thousand, let's say, for your work on the land, while our host, the peasant here, however hard he works, can never get more than fifty roubles, is just as dishonest as my earning more than my chief clerk, and Malthus getting more than a station-master.
He quoted Spencer and Malthus, and enunciated the biological law of development.
This is the doctrine of Malthus, applied to the whole animal and vegetable kingdoms.
Adam Smith and Malthus, two younger Gradgrinds, were out at lecture in custody; and little Jane, after manufacturing a good deal of moist pipe-clay on her face with slate-pencil and tears, had fallen asleep over vulgar fractions.
After alluding airily to the Vehmgericht, aqua tofana, Carbonari, the Marchioness de Brinvilliers, the Darwinian theory, the principles of Malthus, and the Ratcliff Highway murders, the article concluded by admonishing the Government and advocating a closer watch over foreigners in England.
Yet there have been known to be philosophers and plain men who swore by Malthus in the books, and would, nevertheless, subscribe to a relief fund in time of a famine.
Malthus and Ricardo quite omit it; the Annual Register is silent; in the Conversations' Lexicon it is not set down; the President's Message, the Queen's Speech, have not mentioned it; and yet it is never nothing.
1766: Thomas Robert Malthus, economist and author of An Essay On The Principles Of Population (1798), was born.
Mayhew reframes Malthus, spatializing intellectual history by setting his thought on three scales: the global, the national, and the local.
In 1798, with the world's population hovering at around one billion, English political economist Thomas Malthus wrote a fateful essay.
The Reverend Thomas Robert Malthus well represented the unspiritual, the uncreative masses of men whose whole nature was depraved and whose sole destiny was death--save for a meager elect miraculously salvaged by divine favor in this world as in the next.