man-hour

(redirected from Man-hours)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

man-hour

(măn′our′)
n.
An industrial unit of production equal to the work one person can produce in an hour.

man-hour

n
(Units) a unit for measuring work in industry, equal to the work done by one man in one hour

man′-hour`



n.
a unit of measurement based on an ideal amount of work accomplished by one person in an hour.
[1915–20]
Translations

man-hour

[ˈmænˌauəʳ] n (Industry) → ora di lavoro
References in periodicals archive ?
Kelvin Yong and his site team for their excellent site management, supervision, hard work and dedication for achieving zero man-hours loss for this job.
This is almost three times the man-hours required to complete construction of the Burj Khalifa (22 million man-hours).
The FLNG Turret attained a customer satisfaction score of 77 per cent with five million LTI free man-hours and the Solan oil storage facility had a score of 82 per cent with 2.
2 million safe man-hours from January to September 2013 without LTI.
In January, the Grand Prairie, Texas, location of Hanson Pressure Pipe, a sister division, surpassed 1 million man-hours without a lost-time injury as well.
Meantime, the overhauling process of Boeing-707 cargo plane took 18 months and 80,000 man-hours of work.
The company celebrated five million man-hours without a lost injury time," he added.
Audubon Engineering, a project solutions provider, has announced that its employees have worked more than one million safe man-hours in 2011.
SK E&C on May 19, 2011 was quoted as saying: "The 41 million man-hours are equivalent to a situation where a total of 1,000 people work around the clock for 1,700 straight days without any rest.
SAOG (AHEC) has said it has completed 32 million man-hours without any lost-time injury since 2007.
The Fort Wright plant employees exceeded one million man-hours worked without a lost-time injury in September of 2009.
Dominion Virginia Power today reported it has reached a safety milestone at the Virginia City Hybrid Energy Center project, recording its first 1 million man-hours worked without a lost-time injury.