Mandaean

(redirected from Mandaeism)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Mandaeism: Manichaeism, Manichæism

Man·dae·an

also Man·de·an  (măn-dē′ən)
n.
1. A member of a Gnostic sect historically concentrated in Iraq and Iran but now largely dispersed due to war and persecution.
2. Mandaic.

[Mandaic mandaya, having knowledge, from manda, knowledge, from earlier Aramaic manda', madda', infinitive of yəda', to know; see ydʕ in Semitic roots.]

Man·dae′an adj.

Mandaean

(mænˈdɪən) or

Mandean

n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a member of a Gnostic sect of Iraq
2. (Languages) the form of Aramaic used by this sect
adj
(Other Non-Christian Religions) of or relating to this sect
[C19: from Aramaic mandaya Gnostics, from mandā knowledge]
Manˈdaeanism, Manˈdeanism n

Man•dae•an

or Man•de•an

(mænˈdi ən)

n.
1. a member of a Gnostic sect with modern adherents in SE Iraq and Khuzistan in Iran.
2. Also, Man•da′ic (-ˈdeɪ ɪk) a form of Aramaic used in sacred texts of the Mandaeans.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Mandaeans.
[1870–75; < Mandaean mandayy(ā) Gnostics (literally, the knowing ones) + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mandaean - a member of a small Gnostic sect that originated in Jordan and survives in Iraq and who believes that John the Baptist was the MessiahMandaean - a member of a small Gnostic sect that originated in Jordan and survives in Iraq and who believes that John the Baptist was the Messiah
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
2.Mandaean - the form of Aramaic used by the MandeansMandaean - the form of Aramaic used by the Mandeans
Aramaic - a Semitic language originally of the ancient Arameans but still spoken by other people in southwestern Asia
Adj.1.Mandaean - of or relating to the Mandaean people or their language or culture
References in periodicals archive ?
Mandaeans are an ethno-religious community, practicing Mandaeism, which is a Gnostic religion with a strongly dualistic worldview.
Mandaeism or Mandaeanism is a monotheistic religion with a strongly dualistic worldview.
Each section presumes that readers have one or more of the English translations of the Nag Hammadi codices, or of the source books for patristic accounts of gnosticism, Manichaeism, or Mandaeism.