Mandan

(redirected from Mandans)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Related to Mandans: North Dakota

Man·dan

 (măn′dăn′)
n. pl. Mandan or Man·dans
1. A member of a Native American people formerly living in villages along the Missouri River in south-central North Dakota, with present-day descendants on Lake Sakakawea in west-central North Dakota.
2. The Siouan language of the Mandan.

[French Mandane, probably from Dakota mawátaNna.]

Man•dan

(ˈmæn dæn, -dən)

n., pl. -dans, (esp. collectively) -dan.
1. a member of an American Indian people of North Dakota.
2. the Siouan language of the Mandans.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
By his exertions, trading posts had been established, in 1808, in the Sioux country, and among the Aricara and Mandan tribes; and a principal one, under Mr.
Earlier, in 1822, the Mandans had laid out their village.
Mandans unlike their fellow Indians build Welsh coracles and not canoes.
They discovered America and befriended the Mandan Indians.
Hail [1980] does qualify that statement by including Cheyenne as wearers of the style and she refers to the Mandans as possible originators.
The expedition members were fascinated by the Bull Dance and the Mandans by York, William Clark's black slave and personal servant.
These include the Mandans, the Kutenai, the Padoucas, the Comanches, the Aztecs and the Cherokee.
The Mandans were agricultural people and they knew how to survive--I guess I could says that about all Indian tribes.
The Mandans were a tribe belonging to the Sioux linguistic family.
In particular, the smallpox epidemic of 1780-82 marked a turning point in the struggles between westward-expanding Sioux groups and the semisedentary tribes that lived along the upper Missouri in present-day North and South Dakota, the Mandans, Hidatsas, and Arikaras.
But Senior says it was when he was told of the alleged link that he began tailoring his evidence to ``prove'' the Mandans to be the lost Welsh tribe.
Legend has it that the Welsh contingent sailed up the river systems from Alabama, settling initially where Kentucky stands today,before travelling on via the Ohio and the Mississippi into the Missouri, where they met the Mandans.